Tag Archives: World Toilet Day 2017

Sanitation experts review Bollywood’s “Toilet: A Love Story”

This is the score CAWST’s sanitation experts gave for the Bollywood film Toilet: Ek Prem Katha or Toilet: A Love Story, which they reviewed for World Toilet Day.  Read the full review by CAWST Communications and Engagement Officer Holly Claeys.

Toilet Design 

Role of Government 

Fecal Sludge Management 

Behaviour Change 

Developing Competencies 

Handwashing 

 

World Toilet Day podcast with Jack Sim, founder of the World Toilet Organization

World Toilet Day podcast with Jack Sim – Finding Impact, November 14, 2017.

Jack Sim, Founder of the World Toilet Organization (WTO) has been a successful businessman for all of his adult life. After achieving financial success in his 40s, he felt a strong desire to give back to humanity. findingimpactlogo250px

Jack found that toilets were often neglected and grew concerned that the topic was draped in embarrassment and taboo. In 1998, he established the Restroom Association of Singapore (RAS) whose mission was to raise the standards of public toilets in Singapore and around the world.

Jack soon realized that there were other organizations worldwide like RAS, however, they lacked the channels to collaborate and share ideas. As a result, in 2001, Jack founded the World Toilet Organization (WTO), eventually earning himself the nickname Mr. Toilet.

On this podcast, we will cover:

  • Jack’s interest in tackling a problem that most people felt uncomfortable talking about and how he began to shift this taboo.
  • The origins of World Toilet Day (November 19) and how to be opportunistic when seeking partnerships.
  • The importance of relinquishing credit as a leader and remaining humble. Jack talks about creating a negative space that champions can sign up to eradicate, rather than focusing on being recognized for individual efforts.
  • How to get almost anything for free! While you don’t have resources, you do have a reputation and a story that businesses may want to align with.
  • How to leverage your story to bring attention to your cause. “If you don’t publish, you perish” Academics need to write, ask them how you can help! Helps bring credibility to your cause too.
  • The importance of being mission driven and removing individuals from the equation. “You are not the important thing, the mission is the important thing.”

WSUP – A guide to strengthening the enabling environment for faecal sludge management: experience from Bangladesh, Kenya and Zambia

A guide to strengthening the enabling environment for faecal sludge management: experience from Bangladesh, Kenya and Zambia. WSUP, November 2017. wsup

This Guide presents an introduction to conceptualising and strengthening the enabling environment for faecal sludge management (FSM) services in low-income urban areas.

It is based on WSUP’s experience working with Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to develop market-based solutions for on-site sanitation services in the cities of Dhaka and Chittagong (Bangladesh), Kisumu (Kenya) and Lusaka (Zambia).

Why is FSM so important?

FSM is the process by which faecal sludge is contained, collected, transported, treated and then safely disposed of or reused. 2.7 billion (38%) people around the world are dependent on on-site sanitation facilities like pit latrines and septic tanks, which contain and partially treat faecal sludge on-site (as opposed to centralised systems like sewers that remove waste from households and transport it to treatment facilities).

Read the complete report.

WaterAid – Out of Order: The State of the World’s Toilets 2017

Out of Order: The State of the World’s Toilets 2017. WaterAid, November 2017.

Our World Toilet Day report Out of Order explores how the lack of decent toilets around the world prevents women and girls from fulfilling their potential.

The report finds Ethiopia is now the country with the world’s highest percentage of people without toilets, while India remains the nation with the highest number of people without a toilet. wateraid

While both have made progress, millions still suffer the fear and indignity of relieving themselves in the open or in unsafe or unhygienic toilets – a situation which is most dangerous for girls and women.

Read the complete article.

 

World Toilet Day 2017: Q&A with USAID Sanitation Expert Jesse Shapiro

World Toilet Day 2017: Q&A with USAID Sanitation Expert Jesse Shapiro. Global Waters, November 15, 2017.

Jesse Shapiro is the Environmental Health Team Lead, Senior Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) Advisor, and Sanitation Focal Point at USAID based in the Global Health Bureau.

Jesse Shapiro observes a life-size game of chutes and ladders, which illustrates the perils of poor sanitation and hygiene behaviors, on a field visit to an informal neighborhood in Delhi, India. Photo Credit: USAID

Jesse Shapiro observes a life-size game of chutes and ladders, which illustrates the perils of poor sanitation and hygiene behaviors, on a field visit to an informal neighborhood in Delhi, India. Photo Credit: USAID

He provides WASH technical support to USAID missions in Africa and South East Asia with a focus on new project development and an increased emphasis on sanitation programming. He has an MS in civil engineering and spent seven years in East Timor and the Marshall Islands working with governments on sanitation.

Sanitation is one the most basic human needs, and there is no end to its impact on people’s daily lives in preventing disease and preserving dignity.”

Read the complete article.

 

Celebrating Sanitation and Handwashing on World Toilet Day – Global Handwashing Partnership

Celebrating Sanitation and Handwashing on World Toilet Day. Global Handwashing Partnership, November 15, 2017.

Just a month after Global Handwashing Day, the Global Handwashing Partnership is celebrating World Toilet Day on November 19thWorld Toilet Day drives action to solve the global sanitation crisis.

Like handwashing, sanitation is a vital way to prevent diseases and protect health. For example, both can prevent diarrhea, which remains a leading cause of death and long-term suffering for children around the world.

Credit: WASHplus Project

Credit: WASHplus Project

Proper handwashing and safe sanitation are essential for good health and development, but access to both is far behind where is needs to be. In some countries, fewer than 10% of peoplehave access to basic handwashing facilities.

Globally, 4.5 billion people lack a safe toilet with proper waste treatment. This affects health and dignity, and costs lives. View this National Geographic picture story for a moving look at how open defecation affects communities around the world.

Read the complete article.