Tag Archives: WASHpals

Webinar: Designing Effective Sanitation Enterprises – USAID WASHPaLS

Webinar: Designing Effective Sanitation Enterprises

On September 26, the USAID-funded Water, Sanitation and Hygiene Partnerships and Learning for Sustainability – (WASHPaLS) Project held this webinar and discussion on sanitation enterprises and design considerations.

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WASHPaLS presents a detailed discussion of the elements of a sanitation enterprise including mechanisms and practices, design approaches, and key considerations based upon the findings a recent WASHPaLS desk review.

The presentation was followed by a panel discussion comprising Anddy Omoluabi and Nneka Akwunwa, WaterAid Nigeria; Geoff Revell, WaterSHED Cambodia; Sanjay Singh, PSI India; and Rishi Agarwal, FSG.


This webinar is a follow-up discussion from a previous WASHPaLS webinar, Scaling Market-Based Sanitation.

 

USAID  Desk Review on Market-Based Rural Sanitation Development Programs

Below is the link to the release of a new USAID desk review prepared under the Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene Partnerships and Learning for Sustainability (WASHPaLS):

 Desk Review on Market-Based Rural Sanitation Development Programs.

 The USAID/WASHPaLS project prepared a desk review that investigates the current state of knowledge in market-based sanitation (MBS) and establishes a framework to analyze, design, and improve MBS interventions. This report is based on a survey of approximately 600 documents on MBS, in-depth research into 13 MBS intervention case studies across the global south, and interviews with sector experts and program personnel. usaidlogo

This review offers a framework that draws upon and contributes to existing evidence across the three crucial challenges to scaling MBS—appropriate product and business model choices, viability of sanitation enterprises, and difficulty of unlocking public and private financing for sanitation. It also helps funders and implementers design, analyze, and improve MBS interventions and offers guidance for stakeholders and governments interested in using sanitation markets to expand sanitation coverage and reduce open defecation. In addition, this review highlights the larger contextual parameters that determine the applicability of MBS within a given market.

This review was made possible by contributions from Rishi Agarwal, Subhash Chennuri, and Aaron Mihaly (FSG); Dr. Jeff Albert (Aquaya); Dr. Mimi Jenkins (University of California, Davis); Morris Israel (Tetra Tech); Hannah Taukobong (Iris Group, Inc.); Elizabeth Jordan and Jesse Shapiro (USAID); and others.

An Examination of CLTS’s Contributions Toward Universal Sanitation

Pleased to share a new report from USAID for dissemination: An Examination of CLTS’s Contributions Toward Universal Sanitation.

This review of scientific and gray literature related to community-led total sanitation (CLTS) assesses the knowledge base on best practices and identifies evidence gaps.  It was prepared for USAID by the Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene Partnerships and Learning for Sustainability (WASHPaLS) project under Task Order number AID-OAA-TO-16-00016 of the Water and Development Indefinite Delivery Indefinite Quantity Contract (WADI), contract number AID-OAA-I-14-00068.

This review offers a description of the CLTS intervention, tracing its evolution in theory and practice from Southeast Asia to its current place as a global phenomenon, and explores the open defecation free (ODF) concept, analyzing its strengths and weaknesses.

It highlights the disconnect between the independent monitoring and analysis of CLTS program results and internal performance reports released by implementing organizations and their donors. This review also seeks to assess circumstances in which CLTS works best, the most promising implementation modalities, and instances where CLTS may not be suitable.

This literature review was made possible by contributions from Jeff Albert, Valentina Zuin, Rachel Peletz, Caroline Delaire, and Ranjiv Khush (Aquaya Institute); Morris Israel and Jonathan Annis (Tetra Tech); Joe Brown (Georgia Institute of Technology); Marion (Mimi) Jenkins (University of California, Davis); and Aditi Krishna and Hannah Taukobong (Iris Group).

USAID Webinar – Toward a Hygienic Environment for Infants and Young Children: A Review

Toward a Hygienic Environment for Infants and Young Children: A Review

This United States Agency for International development (USAID) webinar to discusses findings from the recent report, “Toward a Hygienic Environment for Infants and Young Children: A Review of the Literature.”

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USAID recently completed this review of the scientific and grey literature to capture the state of knowledge of the health risks to infants and young children from fecal exposure in their home environments, focusing on historically underemphasized sources and transmission pathways not disrupted by the traditional suite of WASH measures.

The review is complemented by an array of interviews with researchers and practitioners and includes two central findings: (1) domestic animal excreta may be a significant source of risk; and (2) direct ingestion of pathogens via eating feces, dirt (geophagy) and/or mouthing behaviors represent important paths of transmission. Technological and behavioral measures that reduce exposure to excreta in play spaces are of growing interest for the protection of infant and child health.

In this webinar, Julia Rosenbaum, along with Francis Ngure and Jeff Albert will present highlights from the desk review, share key lessons for implementers, and share the project’s next steps in this area.

Learn more about the literature review: http://www.tetratech.com/en/documents/toward-a-hygienic-environment-for-infants-and-young-children-a-review-of-the-literature

Toward a Hygienic Environment for Infants and Young Children: A Review of the Literature – USAID/WASHpals

Toward a Hygienic Environment for Infants and Young Children: A Review of the Literature. USAID Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene Partnerships and Learning for Sustainability (WASHPaLS), February 2018.

 For nearly six decades, the routes of pathogen transmission from human excreta to a new host have been reflected in the seminal “F-diagram” via fluids, fingers, flies, fields (floors, earth, dirt), and fomites (surfaces).

The WASHPaLS project conducted a review of the scientific and grey literature, complemented by dozens of key informant interviews with researchers and practitioners, to re-examine the F-diagram, highlighting the underemphasized sources of pathogens and transmission pathways that are of particular relevance to the health of infant and young children (IYC) and not disrupted by the traditional suite of WASH measures.

These are:

  • domestic animal excreta as a source of risk, and
  • direct ingestion of pathogens via eating feces, dirt (geophagy) or through mouthing behaviors as additional pathways.

Webinar – Contribution of Community-Led Total Sanitation to Ending Open Defecation: Findings of a Desk Review

Webinar – Contribution of Community-Led Total Sanitation to Ending Open Defecation: Findings of a Desk Review, December 14, 2017. WASHPaLS-email

On Wednesday, December 13, 2017, the USAID-funded Water, Sanitation and Hygiene Partnerships and Learning for Sustainability (WASHPaLS) Project held a webinar on the role of community-led total sanitation (CLTS) in helping to end open defecation.

WASHPaLS presented key findings from a desk review assessing the knowledge base on CLTS program performance. The findings and identified evidence gaps will inform the WASHPaLS research agenda for subsequent years of the project.

 

USAID WASHpals grant – Habit Formation Approaches and Gender Equity & Social Inclusion Innovations for Hygiene Behavior Change

Request for Expressions of Interest for “Habit Formation Approaches and Gender Equity & Social Inclusion Innovations for Hygiene Behavior Change”

  • Opportunity Number: WASHPaLS-EOI-001
  • Issuance Date: June 2, 2017
  • Questions Due Date: June 8, 2017; 12 noon ET
  • EOI Submission Due Date: June 23, 2017; 5:00 pm ET
  • Submit to: Opportunities@washpals.org

The WASHPaLS Grant program contributes to the project’s learning agenda by supporting grantees to investigate innovative ideas in programming for the adoption of key hygiene behaviors. usaidlogo

Over the life of the project and through several rounds of solicitations WASHPaLS expects to award at least 10 grants to investigate the effectiveness of innovative approaches to improving and sustaining hygiene behaviors.

The objective of this initial round of grants is to support learning related to the application of habit formation and Gender and Social Inclusion principles to hygiene behavior change (HBC). Applicants must specify which of the two areas their EOI addresses. EOIs may be for new stand-alone activities or for activities that build-on or complement on-going projects. For purposes of this REOI, HBC refers to those behaviors that link directly to diarrheal disease and mortality and morbidity of children under age five in the household, including:

(1) safe disposal of adult and child feces;

(2) handwashing with soap;

(3) safe drinking water management; and

(4) food hygiene.

WASHPaLS anticipates awarding up to four (4) grants from this solicitation. The number of awards is dependent upon the number of meritorious applications received and available funding. Depending on the applications received, WASHPaLS will determine how many awards will be issued to each focus area. WASHPaLS and USAID reserve the right to award none, one, or multiple grants as a result of this solicitation. Awards are anticipated to range from $50,000 to $300,000. In accordance with Automated Directives System (ADS) 302.3.4.13, U.S.-based organizations are limited to $100,000.

Additional information is available in this document.

Also, there is a helpful Questions and Answers document.