Tag Archives: public finance

FINANCE BRIEF: South Africa’s Equitable Share Formula: a useful model for WASH financing?

South Africa’s Equitable Share Formula is a mechanism for transfer of funds from central to local government, to support basic services including water and sanitation. This Finance Brief outlines how the system works, and reports on its use for water and sanitation. There are a number of problems with implementation of the Equitable Share in South Africa; however, we consider that the mechanism per se is good, and can be a useful model for other countries.

http://www.publicfinanceforwash.com/resources/finance-brief-5-south-africas-equitable-share-formula-useful-model-wash-financing

Public Finance for WASH initiative launched

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Today sees the launch of Public Finance for WASH, a research and advocacy initiative aiming to increase awareness of domestic public finance and its critical importance for water and sanitation provision in low-income countries. Check out our website www.publicfinanceforwash.com.

This is a collaborative initiative between IRC, Water & Sanitation for the Urban Poor (WSUP), and Trémolet Consulting. A key aim is to offer easy-to-read but rigorous information about domestic public finance solutions: our first three Finance Briefs are now available for download from our website, and over the coming year we will be building a comprehensive resource library.

And just to make sure we’re on the same page: what exactly is domestic public finance? Essentially, it’s money derived from domestic taxes, raised nationally (e.g. by the Kenyan government) or locally (e.g. by Nairobi’s municipal government). This money is going to be critical for achieving the water and sanitation SDGs: so how can we all work together to ensure that what we’re doing is supporting (not inhibiting) the development of effective public finance systems? And how can public finance be spent in ways that catalyse the development of dynamic markets for water and sanitation services?

To find out more, please check out the website. If you’d like to become involved in any way, get in touch!