Tag Archives: gender

New guide on female-friendly toilets by WaterAid, WSUP and Unicef

1 in 3 people across the world don’t have a decent toilet of their own. But it’s not just a question of lacking a household toilet – low availability of public and community toilets is also an issue. Where they do exist, these facilities often don’t meet the needs of women and girls, undermining women’s human rights.

The ‘Female-friendly guide‘, out in October 2018 and written by WaterAid, UNICEF and WSUP, is designed primarily for use by local authorities in towns and cities who are in charge of public and community toilets. It’s also useful for national governments, public and private service providers, NGOs, donors and civil society organisations who play a role in delivering these services.

The guide explains why toilets must be female-friendly, before detailing the essential and desirable features needed to make them so. It also suggests ways to increase gender sensitivity in town planning on sanitation.

Recommendations and practical steps have been drawn from existing literature, expert opinion and analysis of pioneering experiences from around the world.

The guide is available to download now, and will also be presented at the UNC Water and Health Conference on 1 November 2018.

Download “Female-friendly public and community toilets: a guide for planners and decision makers”.

This news item was originally published on WaterAid’s WASH Matters website.

Sylvia Cabus on Gender Mainstreaming in Water and Sanitation Programming – Global Waters Radio

Sylvia Cabus on Gender Mainstreaming in Water and Sanitation Programming. Global Waters Radio, August 24, 2018.

Sylvia Cabus serves as Senior Gender Advisor for USAID’s Office of Gender Equality and Women’s Empowerment. cabus

In this podcast, Sylvia speaks with Global Waters Radio about some of the many ways the Agency integrates gender into its water, sanitation, and hygiene programming, and talks about how gender mainstreaming contributes to improved livelihood opportunities for women, better educational access for girls, and greater sustainability for WASH development interventions.

The strong connections between WASH improvements and girls and women’s empowerment received prominent mention in the U.S. Government’s first-ever Global Water Strategy, released in 2017, which notes as part of its first Strategic Objective that “access to sanitation for women and girls is particularly crucial to preserving basic dignity, improving access to education and economic opportunities, and reducing gender-based violence.”

Link to the podcast and transcript.

Toilets need water, Indian women suffer under ODF drive

Toilets in households have only increased the drudgery of village women as they have to fetch water from faraway sources for toilet use, writes Amita Bhaduri, Programme Director of the Society for Promotion of Wastelands Development (SPWD), in an article posted on the Indian Water Portal.

Rajasthan is all geared up for the open defecation free (ODF) status well before the national deadline of October 2, 2019. According to the assistant engineer of the nagar parishad, Resha Singh, 4.75 lakh [475 thousand] toilets have been constructed since October 2, 2014 in Alwar district which is about to be declared ODF.

Paari, a 45-year-old woman of Ghevron ki dhaani village in the district got a toilet at her household under this toilet construction drive. She does not have to go far away to find a place for her sanitary needs anymore. She is, however, unhappy and exhausted from the numerous trips to the water source she has to make to get water in the toilet. Her feet are aching from treading the path filled with rocks and thorns without any footwear for protection.

Water access and women's donkey work

Read the full article

CLTS Knowledge Hub seeking a consultant to to carry out a desk-based review on the topic of Sanitation, Men and Boys

The CLTS Knowledge Hub at IDS is seeking a consultant to to carry out a desk-based review on the topic of Sanitation, Men and Boys. clts2

The purpose of this review is to explore the other side of gender – men and boys, in sanitation and hygiene.

Whilst discussions around gender in WASH (and elsewhere) often focus on the roles, positions or impacts on women and girls, we are curious to explore how men and boys are/are not engaged in efforts to improve sanitation and change social norms, and how they can or need to be targeted to make efforts more successful.

Only when women and men are equally and meaningfully involved in sanitation and hygiene programs, can they result in positive lasting change.

Our main aims for this review are to:

  • Explore how men and boys can be more meaningfully engaged in the WASH process to achieve sustainable behaviour change and a new social norm.
  • See what specific approaches and methods may be needed and are being used in different contexts to stop men and boys from practicing OD.
  • Gain a deeper understanding of power dynamics, relationships and roles and responsibilities within households and communities when it comes to sanitation and hygiene, and how these impact on long term sustainability.

Additional information

USAID webinar – Women in Waste Management: An Opportunity

Webinar: Women in Waste Management: An Opportunity

USAID’s E3/Urban Team invites you to join us for an online panel discussion on January 17 to discuss women’s role in waste management. webinar

Women in Asia play a central role in environmental management, yet their work in the sector is often unpaid or underpaid.

This Urban-Links webinar will discuss:

  • Key constraints for women’s empowerment and job creation in the solid waste management sector;
  • What models work and how do we know they work. What metrics are NGO’s and donors using to measure the empowerment of women in the solid waste management sector;
  • How can grant-making under the USAID-funded Municipal Waste Recycling Program empower women in the sector.

Moderators

  • Clare Romanik, Senior Urban Specialist with USAID’s Office of Land and Urban
  • Marianne Carliez Gillet, Director of Global Program Management for the Development Innovations Group

Panelists

  • Ly Nguyen, Founder and Director of the Center for Environment and Community Research in Vietnam
  • Dr. Vella Atizenza, Assistant Professor at the College of Public Affairs and Development, University of the Philippines at Los Banos

Webinar Information

 

World Bank WASH reports on gender, commercial finance & the WASH Poverty Diagnostic

Reducing Inequalities in Water Supply, Sanitation, and Hygiene in the Era of the Sustainable Development Goals: Synthesis Report of the Water Supply, Sanitation, and Hygiene (WASH) Poverty Diagnostic Initiative. World Bank, August 2017.

The Water Supply, Sanitation, and Hygiene (WASH) Poverty Diagnostic Initiative focuses on what it would take to reduce existing inequalities in WASH services worldwide. This report, a synthesis of that global initiative, offers new insights on how data can be used to inform allocation decisions to reduce inequalities and prioritize investment in WASH to boost human capital. It also offers a fresh perspective on service delivery that considers how institutional arrangements affect the incentives of a range of actors.

Easing the Transition to Commercial Finance for Sustainable Water and Sanitation. World Bank, August 2017.

Providing sustainable water supply and sanitation (WSS) services in developing countries remains an immense, and increasingly urgent, challenge. Chapter two sets out how the sector is currently funded and why business as usual is insufficient for meeting WSS-related goals, covering the size of the investment gap, and the challenges presented by the status quo. Chapter three proposes a financing framework toward more effective use of existing funds to enable the mobilization of new sources of finance, and explains the benefits and costs of commercial finance. Chapters four to six detail the three components of the financing framework, providing practical advice and global experiences that demonstrate how countries can begin to make progress. Chapter seven summarizes how stakeholders can bring the three components together to mobilize commercial finance, and provides the main conclusions and recommendations of the report

The Rising Tide: A New Look at Water and Gender. World Bank, August 2017.

The report reviews a vast body of literature to present a “thinking device” that visualizes water as an asset, a service, and a “space.” It shows water an arena where gender relations play out in ways that often mirror inequalities between the sexes. And it examines norms and practices related to water that often exacerbate ingrained gender and other hierarchies. Informal institutions, taboos, rituals, and norms all play a part in maintaining these hierarchies and can even reinforce gender inequality. The report’s key message is clear—interventions in water-related domains are important in and of themselves and for enhancing gender equality more broadly. The report discusses examples of initiatives that have had intended and unintended consequences for gender equality, and makes the important point that gender inequality does not always show up where we might expect.

SHARE – Understanding Gendered Sanitation Vulnerabilities: A Study in Uttar Pradesh

Understanding Gendered Sanitation Vulnerabilities: A Study in Uttar Pradesh, 2017. SHARE Project.

The aim of this study was to understand rural women and girls’ age-specific experiences of using and accessing sanitation. The study focused on the accessibility of latrines and the conditions of sanitation experienced across age, religion, caste, etc. Share_Logo_MAIN_STRAP_RGB

The study objectives were informed by research indicating that women and girls have unique needs, and that these needs vary between urban and rural environments.

Specifically, we were interested in assessing the gender, caste, and age-specific experiences of SRPS that rural women and girls experience, and to suggest ways that SDG indicators and guidelines for Swachh Bharat Mission—Rural (SBM) in India might be adjusted to be more sensitive to the unique needs and stresses of rural women and girls without access to sanitation.