Sept 26, 2018 Webinar on Designing Effective Sanitation Enterprises

Webinar on Designing Effective Sanitation Enterprises

  • Date: September 26, 2018
  • Time: 8–9:30 a.m. EDT (New York time)

The USAID-funded Water, Sanitation and Hygiene Partnerships and Learning for Sustainability (WASHPaLS) Project invites you to a presentation and discussion on sanitation enterprises and design considerations. webinar

This webinar will examine the elements of a sanitation enterprise, including mechanisms and practices, design approaches, and key considerations based on the findings of a recent WASHPaLS desk review, Scaling Market-Based Sanitation: Desk Review on Market-Based Rural Sanitation Development Programs.

The presentation will be followed by a panel discussion with Anddy Omoluabiand Nneka Akwunwa, WaterAid Nigeria; Geoff Revell, WaterSHED Cambodia; Sanjay Singh, PSI India; and Rishi Agarwal, FSG.

Click on the link to register.

Enabling environments for inclusive citywide sanitation: a conceptual framework

Enabling environments for inclusive citywide sanitation: a conceptual framework. WSUP Blog, September 2018.

A necessary shift is taking place: away from a narrow focus on building taps and toilets, and towards an understanding of water and sanitation as a service, whose effectiveness depends on the wider enabling environment. In simple terms, universal coverage requires services which are 1) sustainable and 2) delivered at scale – and neither is possible without strong systems. wsup.png

In Stockholm the increasing momentum towards systems change was evident – my week began with an excellent “morning of systems” convened by Agenda for Change highlighting a number of ongoing initiatives in this area  –  and served to build on July’s UN High-Level Political Forum and the associated SDG 6 synthesis report, underlining the imperative to strengthen governance, finance and capacity development if we are to achieve universal access.

So how does WSUP work to strengthen systems? From the outset, system-strengthening has been embedded in our Theory of Change: we partner with institutions and the private sector to develop effective service delivery models, and work in parallel to create the conditions for these services to be provided at the city level, including within low-income areas.

Read the complete article.

Is shared sanitation the answer to Maputo’s sanitation challenge?

Is shared sanitation the answer to Maputo’s sanitation challenge? Water Blog, August 20, 2018.

Poor sanitation is the all too familiar story in many expanding African cities and Mozambique’s capital city Maputo is no exception. In fact, over half of the country’s urban population lack access to even basic sanitation.

With an estimated 668 million city dwellers around the world not having access to safe sanitation, overcoming sanitation challenges in cities like Maputo will go a long way towards achieving the Sustainable Development Goal for safe sanitation (SDG 6.2).

sharedsanitation

Sanitation Blocks in Charmanculo

But large numbers can sometimes obscure or make abstract the tough reality for individuals and families.

The experience of Rute Rodrigues, a widow and mother of five children living in one of many densely populated low-income neighbourhoods (known locally as ‘bairros’)’ is a common one.

As she recounts: “We had a precarious latrine that over the course of time became damaged and collapsed due to heavy rains leaving us without access to even basic sanitation”.

Read the complete article.

A listing of 2018 WASH reports from the World Health Organization

2018 WASH Reports from the World Health Organization

Engaging men and boys in sanitation and hygiene programmes

Engaging men and boys in sanitation and hygiene programmes. IDS, August 2018.

Discussions of gender in sanitation and hygiene often focus on the roles, positions or impacts on women and girls. Such a focus is critical to improving the gendered outcomes in Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH), as women and girls bear the greatest burden of WASH work yet are often excluded from planning, delivery and monitoring community WASH activities as a result of having less power, resources, time and status than their male peers.

However, current efforts to improve sanitation and change social norms may not always actively engage men and boys in the most effective way. There is more to learn about how the roles men and boys actually play out in improving use of safe sanitation and improved hygiene practices and – if necessary – how the engagement strategies can be modified to make efforts more successful.

This issue of Frontiers of CLTS shares and builds on the learning from a desk study that explores examples of men’s and boys’ behaviours and gender roles in sanitation and hygiene. Of particular interest is the extent to which the engagement of men and boys in S&H processes is leading to sustainable and transformative change in households and communities and reducing gendered inequality.

The review focuses on men and boys: how to engage them (or not), how to mobilise them as allies in the transformation of S&H outcomes and the problems they contribute to and experience.

USAID WASH in the News

USAID WASH in the News

We scour global news sources to find the latest stories featuring USAID’s work in the water sector (so you don’t have to). Check in for weekly updates to this page or let us know if you have an item to sharenews

Recent news items include:

  • Small Water Enterprises: Providing Safe Drinking Water for Resilient Cities at Stockholm World Water Week
  • Peru’s New Generation Of Water Leaders Reach Across Traditional Government Divides For Natural Infrastructure
  • Keeping the Water Flowing: One Village in Nepal Is Working to Implement a Shared Vision of the Future
  • USAID Cosecha Water Harvesting Program in Honduras

Mapping the evidence on WASH promotion in communities, schools and health facilities – 3ie Impact

Mapping the evidence on WASH promotion in communities, schools and health facilities. 3ie Impact, August 2018.  three

Highlights

  • The number of rigorous studies on WASH promotion in households, schools and communities has increased substantially.
  • Very few rigorous studies exist on WASH promotion in medical facilities.
  • Many new studies evaluate previously under-researched approaches, such as community-led total sanitation, and measure important sector outcomes, including school attendance and reducing open defecation.
  • More studies are needed to measure programme effects on the sustained use of technologies and slippage back to open defecation.
  • A critical need exists for studies on promotional approaches for vulnerable populations, especially people living with disabilities, for whom no studies are available. New, high-quality systematic reviews are available, including ones on the effectiveness of hygiene and sanitation behavioural approaches and menstrual hygiene management.
  • Synthesis gaps remain for high-quality reviews on WASH interventions in schools and on decentralised delivery