Category Archives: Publications

Innovative approaches to sustain handwashing with soap and open defecation free status in rural communities in Tanzania

By SSH4A Tanzania

In Tanzania, SNV has developed, under the Sustainable Sanitation and Hygiene For All programme, two innovative approaches to sustain handwashing with soap and open defecation free status in rural communities. These are triggering with soap at vaccination centres and Jirani (neighbours) sanitation groups.

The first intervention consists of triggering at vaccination centres as they were found to be ideal places to raise awareness of the importance of washing hands with soap among pregnant women, mothers and other caregivers.

The second intervention is based on having neighbours who monitor the sanitation and hygiene progress of the households closest to their homes and sensitise other neighbours on the importance of building, taking care of, and improving sanitation and handwashing facilities.

The following case studies provide practical information for implementing the interventions, and brief discussions on the remaining challenges and lessons learned by the SNV team and their partners on the ground:

SSH4A Tanzania, 2019. Emotional demonstrations (emo-demos) of handwashing with soap at vaccination centres. Dar es Salaam, Tanzania: SNV Tanzania. 8 p. Download case study

SSH4A Tanzania, 2019. Jirani sanitation groups : sustaining open defecation free status in Tanzania. Dar es Salaam, Tanzania: SNV Tanzania Download case study

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Toilet Board Coalition – The Sanitation Economy in Agriculture

The Sanitation Economy in Agriculture: Sector Level Opportunities, New Toolbox, and Case Study. Toilet Board Coalition, November 2018.  tbc.jpg

Sanitation systems have a material impact on agriculture – on the soil, on the water, and
on the people who work and live on plantations. Improving sanitation in agricultural businesses will:

  • Improve the health of workers and their families, increasing well-being and
    productivity
  • Eliminate open defecation and environmental contamination of soil and
    ground-water
  • Reduce climate change impact through reduction of methane emissions

New guide on female-friendly toilets by WaterAid, WSUP and Unicef

1 in 3 people across the world don’t have a decent toilet of their own. But it’s not just a question of lacking a household toilet – low availability of public and community toilets is also an issue. Where they do exist, these facilities often don’t meet the needs of women and girls, undermining women’s human rights.

The ‘Female-friendly guide‘, out in October 2018 and written by WaterAid, UNICEF and WSUP, is designed primarily for use by local authorities in towns and cities who are in charge of public and community toilets. It’s also useful for national governments, public and private service providers, NGOs, donors and civil society organisations who play a role in delivering these services.

The guide explains why toilets must be female-friendly, before detailing the essential and desirable features needed to make them so. It also suggests ways to increase gender sensitivity in town planning on sanitation.

Recommendations and practical steps have been drawn from existing literature, expert opinion and analysis of pioneering experiences from around the world.

The guide is available to download now, and will also be presented at the UNC Water and Health Conference on 1 November 2018.

Download “Female-friendly public and community toilets: a guide for planners and decision makers”.

This news item was originally published on WaterAid’s WASH Matters website.

2018 WASH reports by WSUP

This links to selected 2018 reports on the Water and Sanitation for the Urban Poor website. wsup-logox2 (1)

Understanding the Indian rural sanitation market

How stakeholders should work together to end open defecation.

india_odisha_-_public_toilets-650x433

Toilet block in Odisha, India. Photo: Andrea van der Kerk/IRC

Solving rural sanitation problems in India requires the involvement of multiple stakeholders. These include government, programme implementers, financing institutions, entrepreneurs and households. Understanding the roles, strengths and weaknesses of each stakeholder, how they interact and complement each other, is key to achieving India’s ambitious goal of ending open defecation by 2019.

As a follow-up to the Sanitation Innovation Accelerator, IRC, Ennovent and Ecociate Consultants commissioned a study to gain insights in the sanitation market in Bihar and Odisha, two states with relatively low levels of sanitation coverage: 29% and 43% respectively. The study was conducted over a period of 3 months (from January to March 2017) in two rural districts: one with a high population density and situated in a heavy clay silt agricultural plain (Samastipur district, Bihar) and the other with a low population density situated in a sandy tropical coast (Ganjam district, Odisha).

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Upcoming webinars, new World Bank water utilities toolkit, recent WASH research

WEBINARS

December 13, 2017 – USAID/WASHPaLS webinar on CLTS and open defecation – The USAID-funded Water, Sanitation and Hygiene Partnerships and Learning for Sustainability (WASHPaLS) Project invites you to a webinar examining how community-led total sanitation (CLTS) has contributed to the goal of ending open defecation.

REPORTS/WEBSITES

Toolkit on the Aggregation of Water Supply and Sanitation Utilities. World Bank, December 8. This report describes the methodology applied and outcomes of the Global Study on WSS Utility Aggregation implemented by the Water Global Practice. The work conducted has allowed providing concrete, evidence-based guidance to policy makers and practitioners regarding when, why, and how water and sanitation utilities can work together (“aggregate”) to successfully deliver specific policy outcomes, such as better services or lower costs.

OPEN ACCESS JOURNAL ARTICLES

‘We do not know’: a qualitative study exploring boys perceptions of menstruation in India. BMC Reproductive Health, December 8. These findings provide some optimism that males can become advocates in moving forward the MHM agenda. The reasons for this are twofold: boys were keen for knowledge about menstruation…

Role, ownership and presence of domestic animals in peri-urban households of Kisumu, Kenya. Zoonoses & Public Health, December 5. This research demonstrates the high prevalence of animal ownership in a low-income and high-density peri-urban neighbourhood of an African city.

Affordability in the provision of water and sanitation services: Evolving strategies and imperatives to realise human rights. International Journal of Water Governance, November 2017. In sum, affordability is attained throughvarious efforts: a coordinated institutional structure, clear legal provisions (i.e. formally recognizing the HRtWS), contextually specific policy and plans, accountable regulatory mechanisms and efficiently organised service providers.

ABSTRACT/ORDER

Moving up the sanitation ladder with the help of microfinance in urban Malawi. Jnl WASH for Dev, December 2017. Organisations seeking to improve access to safely managed sanitation by promoting alternative sanitation technologies would succeed if households have access to affordable alternative sanitation technologies and microfinance for sanitation. However, poorer households would need more affordable improved sanitation technologies, flexible microfinance options and possibly targeted subsidies to gain access to safely managed sanitation

Recent WASH publications from USAID, WHO and others

RECENT USAID WASH PUBLICATIONS/RESOURCES

WHO PUBLICATIONS

OPEN ACCESS PUBLICATIONS

ABSTRACT/ORDER