Category Archives: Africa

SEI – How can sanitation policy deliver in Africa? Insights from Rwanda and Uganda

How can sanitation policy deliver in Africa? Insights from Rwanda and Uganda. Stockholm Environment Institute, August 2018.

Sanitation is currently high on the international development agenda. But for policy to be effective, basic enabling factors are required – the right institutional environment and the right governance structures – which in many countries are not yet fully in place.

It is even more important to get these basic factors right as increasing numbers of public, private, and philanthropic bodies at different levels of society become involved in promoting and providing sanitation, driven largely by global goals and international development agendas.

This growing focus on sanitation has led to top-down pressure to meet prescribed targets, which in most cases miss the complexity of context, distort service priorities, and in some cases compromise sustainability.

Based on four years of research in Rwanda and Uganda examining sanitation governance structures, the author sets out policy insights on what is needed for sanitation policy to succeed in sub-Saharan Africa.

The Scoop on Poop: How Open Defecation Free Data Led to Activity Program Pivots in Ethiopia’s Lowlands

The Scoop on Poop: How Open Defecation Free Data Led to Activity Program Pivots in Ethiopia’s Lowlands. Author(s):Nikita Salgaonkar. Organization(s):USAID/Ethiopia, AECOM, September 2018. cla

Sanitation behavior change is a notoriously complex intervention. In the harsh, remote environment of the Ethiopian lowlands, this is particularly so. Community-Led Total Sanitation and Hygiene (CLTSH) interventions, while successful in Ethiopia’s densely populated highland areas, have never been implemented at scale in the lowlands.

We learned that in these communities, dominated by (semi-) pastoralist groups, that the operating conditions for effective, sustained behavior change are highly variable. A Collaborating, Learning and Adapting (CLA) approach helped the program team define, pivot and re-design activities that addressed project effectiveness.

Our experience is drawn from the USAID/Ethiopia-funded Lowland Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene (WASH) Activity that works to accelerate access to improved WASH in three rural lowland regions: Afar, Somali, and Southern Nations, Nationalities, and Peoples (SNNP).

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Money from waste? Revamp your view on sanitation

Money from waste? Revamp your view on sanitation. Water Blog, July 2018.

As an undergraduate student in Kampala, my head was full of thoughts about how I was going to make a living after my studies. Back then Rich Dad Poor Dad was still a best-seller, and I thought to myself: I can become a billionaire if I sell a billion of something to a billion people. Needless to say, it would have to be something that anyone can afford, like toothpaste or chewing gum. uganda.jpg

So, I wondered, what does every human need? It dawned on me: everyone needs water, food, and energy, every day. The next question was how I could make valuable goods from all the three as a civil engineer.

A fascination with sanitation

Over the course of my studies, I became interested in the intimate connections between water, food, and energy. I learnt about the water and nutrient cycles, and how we can recover resources from waste and use them to fertilize crops and generate energy.

Looking at the supply side, each of us generates about 1.5 litres of excreta daily – all together, a huge amount of waste. We can, of course, flush it down the drain and into our rivers, lakes, and oceans; or we can turn our pee and poo into valuable resources, like power and protein.

Read the complete article.

 

Mobile Communities in Ethiopia Seek Fixed Solutions to Their Water and Sanitation Challenges – Global Waters

Mobile Communities in Ethiopia Seek Fixed Solutions to Their Water and Sanitation Challenges – Global Waters, July 24, 2018.

In many respects, Ethiopia’s lowlands represent the final frontier for the country’s ambitious plans to improve water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) coverage through its One WASH National Program. ethiopia

These harsh, arid lands are home to predominantly pastoral communities that roam with their livestock in search of water and grazing lands. Water sources are few and far between, and even when available often do not provide safe drinking water.

Open defecation is the norm for a mobile population that lacks a fixed address upon which to build longer-lasting sanitation infrastructure.

Adding to these challenges are the pressures of regular droughts, depleted groundwater tables, and a lack of institutional capacity on the human and data side.

Read the complete article.

Call for researchers: Increasing the impact of school-based hygiene promotion programmes in Madagascar

This research project, commissioned under WSUP’s Urban Sanitation Research Initiative with funding from Dubai Cares, will use a formative research approach to explore barriers and opportunities for improved school WASH in Madagascar. The over-arching aim of this research is to contribute to the evidence base required to improve and expand Madagascar’s existing WASH Friendly Schools programme (Ecoles Amies de WASH).

The research should aim to identify a feasible adjustment to the current programme model, which generates a sustained increase (by comparison with the existing model as currently applied) in the prevalence of key hygiene behaviours, among schoolchildren exposed to the programme and among members of their households. This will involve a) literature review and formative research to identify one or two adjustments to the current model, which can plausibly be expected to achieve better outcomes; and b) rigorous comparative evaluation of outcomes achieved in implementation of the existing model and adjusted models. Implementation will be funded and managed by WSUP.

The research may be led by a Madagascan or non-Madagascan organisation, but in either case this work will require strong Madagascan involvement in research design and delivery.

More information can be found in the Call here.

Maximum budget under this Call: GBP 65,000

Bids due: 23rd July 2018

Focus country: Madagascar

Languages: French (req’d), English (optional), Malagasy (optional)

Gaining new insights into CLTS and rural WASH from field visits to Babati and Karatu districts, Tanzania – CLTS Knowledge Hub

Gaining new insights into CLTS and rural WASH from field visits to Babati and Karatu districts, Tanzania – CLTS Knowledge Hub, June 2018. clts

CLTS and WASH in the East and Southern Africa region
A five-day regional workshop was held by the CLTS Knowledge Hub in Arusha, Tanzania, in order to foster sharing of knowledge and learning, ideas and innovations, challenges and approaches to CLTS and rural WASH among 36 sanitation practitioners working for international NGOs, cooperation agencies, research centres and at different government levels across eight countries1 from east and southern Africa.

Based on SNV and GoT’s work in the districts, one of the main goals from the visits to Babati and Karatu was to understand and further discuss how CLTS and WASH programming are responding to the need to make the approaches more equitable and inclusive as well as more sustainable in order to deal with the lack of access, the slippages and the low rates of improvement of sanitation facilities which make rural communities strive to reach and maintain Open Defecation Free (ODF) status.

Experiences from the field
The trips started with an early morning visit to a health centre where women with their children were being triggered about hygiene promotion by a local health worker. When we sat down in Magugu Health Centre in Babati, a common scenrio was being acted out by a young mother – she changes her baby’s nappy in front of the group but when she is finished doesn’t go to wash her hands – which prompted the audience to discuss what the problem with this was and what could have been done better. The triggering session then focused on the other critical moments for handwashing throughout the day. During the process the participants learnt about of the main hygiene hazards and procedures, and the health worker emphasised the importance of sharing these messages with the rest of the community.

Read the complete article.

RESEARCH CALL: Exploratory research on increasing the impact of school-based hygiene promotion programmes in Madagascar

This research project, commissioned under WSUP’s Urban Sanitation Research Initiative with funding from Dubai Cares, will use a formative research approach to explore barriers and opportunities for improved school WASH in Madagascar. The over-arching aim of this research is to contribute to the evidence base required to improve and expand Madagascar’s existing WASH Friendly Schools programme (Ecoles Amies de WASH). The research should aim to identify a feasible adjustment to the current programme model, which generates a sustained increase (by comparison with the existing model as currently applied) in the prevalence of key hygiene behaviours, among schoolchildren exposed to the programme and among members of their households.

This will involve a) literature review and formative research to identify one or two adjustments to the current model, which can plausibly be expected to achieve better outcomes; and b) rigorous comparative evaluation of outcomes achieved in implementation of the existing model and adjusted models. Implementation will be funded and managed by WSUP.

The research may be led by a Madagascan or non-Madagascan organisation, but in either case this work will require strong Madagascan involvement in research design and delivery. Some deliverables will need to be in French, some can be in English; internal communications with WSUP may be in French or English, as preferred by the successful bidder.

For more information, see the Research Call here.

Maximum budget under this Call: GBP 65,000
Bids due: Before Madagascar 1700 hours on Tuesday 19th June 2018, to erl [at] wsup [dot com].