Category Archives: Africa

Case Studies from Tanzania: Emotional Demonstrations of Handwashing with Soap at Vaccination Centres & Sustaining Open Defecation-Free Status

Case Studies from Tanzania: Emotional Demonstrations of Handwashing with Soap at Vaccination Centres & Sustaining Open Defecation-Free Status. SNV Tanzania, February 2019. snv

These case studies provide practical information for implementing innovative WASH interventions, and brief discussions on challenges and lessons learned by the SNV Tanzania team and their partners in communities.

Is Africa on Track to Achieve the SDGs on Sanitation?

Is Africa on Track to Achieve the SDGs on Sanitation? A review of progress on the Ngor Declaration on Sanitation and Hygiene. Africasan5, February 2019.

This report summarises the results of the Ngor Commitment Monitoring carried out by 39 countries. The purpose of the report is to provide a baseline three years on from the Ngor Declaration on Sanitation and Hygiene. The report provides an overview of the vision and commitments themselves and the actions required to make progress.

The 10 Ngor Commitments on Sanitation and Hygiene address the areas of the enabling environment that as a whole need to be in place to drive sanitation and hygiene progress. The results of the Ngor Commitment Monitoring show that the enabling environment for sanitation and hygiene is currently uneven.

Progress in the enabling environment for leadership and coordination, and government-led monitoring systems, is not matched for commitments such as waste management, eliminating inequality, and establishing budgets. Unless addressed, the areas of the enabling environment which are lagging behind will act as a drag on the entire sector and hinder realization of the Ngor vision.

New call for researchers (WSUP – Urban Sanitation Research Initiative)

Evaluation of user experience outcomes of Clean Team service use

Focus country: Ghana

This research project is commissioned under the Urban Sanitation Research Initiative, a 2017−2020 research programme core-funded by UK aid from the British people and managed by Water & Sanitation for the Urban Poor (WSUP). This research project will deliver an evaluation of the user experience outcomes of being a customer of Clean Team Ghana.

Clean Team Ghana is a social enterprise providing container-based toilets for a monthly fee covering toilet rental and the container replacement service. Clean Team Ghana currently operates in the city of Kumasi. It has about 1500 customers, and is recruiting new customers at a rate of about 300 per month. This research will aim to generate evidence that is: a) of wide value in Ghana and internationally for understanding the user experience impacts of container-based sanitation service models of this type, and b) of specific value to Clean Team Ghana in further improving their business model.

The research should focus on user experience including i) satisfaction with aspects including for example smell and container replacement service, and ii) subjective wellbeing across a range of dimensions including dignity and security. We anticipate a longitudinal design, with customers interviewed just before service start, soon after service start, and 6 months after service start.

Maximum budget under this Call: GBP 80,000 inclusive of VAT
Bids due: Before UK 1700 hours on 4th March 2019.

For more information visit: https://www.wsup.com/research/open-calls/

Innovative approaches to sustain handwashing with soap and open defecation free status in rural communities in Tanzania

By SSH4A Tanzania

In Tanzania, SNV has developed, under the Sustainable Sanitation and Hygiene For All programme, two innovative approaches to sustain handwashing with soap and open defecation free status in rural communities. These are triggering with soap at vaccination centres and Jirani (neighbours) sanitation groups.

The first intervention consists of triggering at vaccination centres as they were found to be ideal places to raise awareness of the importance of washing hands with soap among pregnant women, mothers and other caregivers.

The second intervention is based on having neighbours who monitor the sanitation and hygiene progress of the households closest to their homes and sensitise other neighbours on the importance of building, taking care of, and improving sanitation and handwashing facilities.

The following case studies provide practical information for implementing the interventions, and brief discussions on the remaining challenges and lessons learned by the SNV team and their partners on the ground:

SSH4A Tanzania, 2019. Emotional demonstrations (emo-demos) of handwashing with soap at vaccination centres. Dar es Salaam, Tanzania: SNV Tanzania. 8 p. Download case study

SSH4A Tanzania, 2019. Jirani sanitation groups : sustaining open defecation free status in Tanzania. Dar es Salaam, Tanzania: SNV Tanzania Download case study

.

Residential Piped Water in Uganda – World Bank

Residential Piped Water in Uganda. World Bank, December 2018.

This World Bank Study provides a basic diagnostic of residential piped water coverage and affordability in Uganda and its relationship with poverty using a series of nationally representative household surveys for the period 2002–13. uganda

The study first analyzes trends in piped water coverage using both administrative and survey data. Demand-side and supply-side factors reducing the take-up of piped water service by households in areas where the service is available are estimated.

The study also documents the extent to which piped water coverage enables households to shift time use away from domestic tasks toward market work, and the beneficial effect that this may have on poverty.

The targeting performance to the poor of water subsidies is estimated and results obtained for Uganda are compared with estimates for other countries.

Finally, the study analyzes issues related to affordability—including the impact of the tariff increase of 2012 on household consumption, poverty, and piped water affordability—as well as the cost for households to connect to the piped water network.

Water and Sanitation in Uganda – World Bank

Water and Sanitation in Uganda. World Bank, December 2018.

This World Bank Study provides a basic diagnostic of access to safe water and sanitation in Uganda and their relationship with poverty. The analysis relies on a series of nationally representative household surveys for the period 2002–13, as well as on qualitative data collection. uganda

The study first relies on household surveys to analyze trends in access to safe water and some of the constraints faced by households for access. The issue of the cost of water for households without a connection to the piped water network is discussed. This includes a discussion of public stand pipes.

Next, qualitative data are presented on the obstacles faced by households in accessing safe water. The next two chapters are devoted to sanitation. The focus is again first on analyzing household survey data about sanitation, including with respect to toilets, bathrooms, waste disposal, and hand washing, and next on an analysis of qualitative data from focus groups and key informants.

Finally, the study reviews some of the policies and programs that have been implemented in order to improve access to safe water and sanitation for the poor as well as options going forward.

eSOS Toilet: An Answer To Kenya’s Sanitation Challenge

eSOS Toilet: An Answer To Kenya’s Sanitation Challenge. Interesting Engineering, January 3, 2018. esos

The smart sanitation solution provides the basic hygiene to those who need it the most.

In the time of emergencies or following a natural disaster, the availability of proper sanitation facilities is always a concern. Undeniably, poor sanitation can often kill as many people as the disaster itself.

This becomes a critical issue, particularly in the temporary camps during the recovery process. Temporary toilet facilities are also responsible for pathogens spreading through a high groundwater table or flooding.

To improve this situation, IHE Delft, the world’s largest international graduate water education facility located in the Netherlands, has developed an emergency Sanitation Operation System (eSOS).

It is a holistic, sustainable and affordable sanitation solution for countries like Kenya, where open defecation is still in practice and also during the aftermath of a disaster.

As a matter of fact, eSOS toilet had a successful test run in the Philippines and its second prototype will soon be tested in Nairobi, Kenya.

What is eSOS? Let’s Take A Deeper Look

Reinventing emergency toilet and treatment facilities, eSOS uses information and communication technology (ICT) to cut down the expenditure of the entire sanitation management chain.

These new and innovative toilet systems can enhance the life quality of the people in proper sanitation need and also reduces the health risks.

Read the complete article.