Category Archives: Sanitary Facilities

Cities of tomorrow: improving sanitation and hygiene services in Babati, Tanzania

Cities of tomorrow: improving sanitation and hygiene services in Babati, Tanzania. WASHmatters, December 19, 2018.

One of the initial outcomes from the research is an agreement by town planners to include sanitation and hygiene in future Babati city planning. wateraid

In the town’s ‘spatial master plan’ the chapter on sanitation now reflects some of the research findings, which will help to ensure that the appropriate sanitation services are considered when it comes to planning the growing town.

The next step for the town is to put together an action plan for sanitation and hygiene services based on the agreed scenarios, and then mobilise resources to implement the plan. We will continue to support Babati as they move forward with their action plan.

Whilst urbanisation can present a lot of opportunities, it also throws up many challenges. This research demonstrates the importance of embedding sanitation and hygiene systems in town planning, and will hopefully be used to encourage and influence other growing towns in Tanzania.

It also illustrates that effective planning and stakeholder collaboration can help to ensure Tanzania’s cities of tomorrow have sustainable access to sanitation and hygiene.

The social dynamics around shared sanitation in an informal settlement of Lusaka, Zambia

The social dynamics around shared sanitation in an informal settlement of Lusaka, Zambia. Journal of Water, Sanitation and Hygiene for Development, December 2018.

This study explored the social dynamics affecting collective management of shared sanitation in Bauleni compound of Lusaka, Zambia. journal.jpeg

Pit latrines were predominantly shared by landlords and tenants on residential plots. However, unwelcome non-plot members also used the latrines due to a lack of physical boundaries. Not all plot members equally fulfilled their cleaning responsibilities, thereby compromising the intended benefits for those conforming.

Landlords typically decided on latrine improvements independent of tenants. Latrines were not systematically monitored or maintained, but punishment for non-conformers was proportionate to the level of infraction. There was no system in place for conflict resolution, nor local organizations to regulate the management of sanitation.

Lastly, there were few enterprises associated with peri-urban sanitation. Social capital was moderately high, and tenants were willing to invest money into improving sanitation. The social dynamics illuminated here provide an important basis for the development of a behavioural intervention targeted towards improving urban sanitation.

Water Utilities – Water Currents, December 13, 2018

Water Utilities – Water Currents, December 13, 2018

Today, more than half the world’s population is living in cities; by 2050, two-thirds of the world’s projected population will be urban. The U.S. Government Global Water Strategy states that this rapid pace of urbanization requires increased attention to urban services and water utilities. utilities

Even as utilities strive to serve growing populations, water availability in cities is projected to shrink by as much as two-thirds by 2050. The ability of utilities to provide a safely managed water service—and to reach the unserved—will be underpinned by their investment in efficiency improvement, policy and institutional capacity development, access to financing, and ability to respond to climate change—even more than infrastructure investments.

Studies and reports in this issue address the management and operational issues of water utilities as well as their operating environment. A special thanks to the staff of DAI, the World Bank, and Asian Development Bank for suggesting water utilities as a topic for this issue and contributing content.

Read the complete issue.

Water Currents: Citywide Inclusive Sanitation

Water Currents: Citywide Inclusive Sanitation – October 23, 2018.

USAID is committed to exploring new ideas to achieving increased access to urban sanitation services.  The agency believes that sustainable sanitation requires that all stakeholders—from policymakers, the private sector, and utilities, to local NGOs, communities, and households—work together to achieve long-term solutions.

This issue of Water Currents includes articles, tools, and other resources related to Citywide Inclusive Sanitation (CWIS), an approach to urban sanitation that involves collaboration among many actors to ensure that everyone benefits from adequate sanitation service delivery outcomes. cwis

CWIS aims to help cities develop comprehensive approaches to sanitation improvement that encompass long-term planning, technical innovation, institutional reforms, and financial mobilization.

The concept of CWIS has been gaining traction among development practitioners. At World Water Week 2018 in Stockholm, the World Bank and other partners released an official Call to Action for all stakeholders to “embrace a radical shift in urban sanitation practices deemed necessary to achieve citywide inclusive sanitation.” This issue of Currents was compiled with help from the World Bank and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

Read the complete issue.

WaterAid; WSUP; UNICEF – Female-friendly public and community toilets: a guide for planners and decision makers

Female-friendly public and community toilets: a guide for planners and decision makers. WaterAid; WSUP; UNICEF, October 2018.

This guide is for local authorities in towns and cities in charge of public and community toilets. This includes leaders and officials in charge of funding, planning, designing, regulating, monitoring or managing these facilities. Toilets in Kumasi

It is also useful for national governments, public and private service providers, NGOs, donors and civil society organisations who have a role in this provision. Although much of the content might apply globally, the focus is on developing country contexts.

The guide can help improve understanding of the requirements of women and girls using public and community toilets.

It provides guidance on how to address these in city planning and local-level implementation, so that planning, designing, upgrading and management results in female-friendly toilets that are more accessible to users whose requirements have often been ignored, including women, girls, older people and people with disabilities.

New guide on female-friendly toilets by WaterAid, WSUP and Unicef

1 in 3 people across the world don’t have a decent toilet of their own. But it’s not just a question of lacking a household toilet – low availability of public and community toilets is also an issue. Where they do exist, these facilities often don’t meet the needs of women and girls, undermining women’s human rights.

The ‘Female-friendly guide‘, out in October 2018 and written by WaterAid, UNICEF and WSUP, is designed primarily for use by local authorities in towns and cities who are in charge of public and community toilets. It’s also useful for national governments, public and private service providers, NGOs, donors and civil society organisations who play a role in delivering these services.

The guide explains why toilets must be female-friendly, before detailing the essential and desirable features needed to make them so. It also suggests ways to increase gender sensitivity in town planning on sanitation.

Recommendations and practical steps have been drawn from existing literature, expert opinion and analysis of pioneering experiences from around the world.

The guide is available to download now, and will also be presented at the UNC Water and Health Conference on 1 November 2018.

Download “Female-friendly public and community toilets: a guide for planners and decision makers”.

This news item was originally published on WaterAid’s WASH Matters website.

Water Currents: Citywide Inclusive Sanitation

Water Currents: Citywide Inclusive Sanitation, October 23, 2018.

USAID is committed to exploring new ideas to achieving increased access to urban sanitation services.  The agency believes that sustainable sanitation requires that all stakeholders—from policymakers, the private sector, and utilities, to local NGOs, communities, and households—work together to achieve long-term solutions.

This issue of Water Currents includes articles, tools, and other resources related to Citywide Inclusive Sanitation (CWIS), an approach to urban sanitation that involves collaboration among many actors to ensure that everyone benefits from adequate sanitation service delivery outcomes. CWIS aims to help cities develop comprehensive approaches to sanitation improvement that encompass long-term planning, technical innovation, institutional reforms, and financial mobilization. cwis

The concept of CWIS has been gaining traction among development practitioners. At World Water Week 2018 in Stockholm, the World Bank and other partners released an official Call to Action for all stakeholders to “embrace a radical shift in urban sanitation practices deemed necessary to achieve citywide inclusive sanitation.” This issue of Currents was compiled with help from the World Bank and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

Read the complete issue.