Category Archives: Progress on Sanitation

SEI – How can sanitation policy deliver in Africa? Insights from Rwanda and Uganda

How can sanitation policy deliver in Africa? Insights from Rwanda and Uganda. Stockholm Environment Institute, August 2018.

Sanitation is currently high on the international development agenda. But for policy to be effective, basic enabling factors are required – the right institutional environment and the right governance structures – which in many countries are not yet fully in place.

It is even more important to get these basic factors right as increasing numbers of public, private, and philanthropic bodies at different levels of society become involved in promoting and providing sanitation, driven largely by global goals and international development agendas.

This growing focus on sanitation has led to top-down pressure to meet prescribed targets, which in most cases miss the complexity of context, distort service priorities, and in some cases compromise sustainability.

Based on four years of research in Rwanda and Uganda examining sanitation governance structures, the author sets out policy insights on what is needed for sanitation policy to succeed in sub-Saharan Africa.

Enabling environments for inclusive citywide sanitation: a conceptual framework

Enabling environments for inclusive citywide sanitation: a conceptual framework. WSUP Blog, September 2018.

A necessary shift is taking place: away from a narrow focus on building taps and toilets, and towards an understanding of water and sanitation as a service, whose effectiveness depends on the wider enabling environment. In simple terms, universal coverage requires services which are 1) sustainable and 2) delivered at scale – and neither is possible without strong systems. wsup.png

In Stockholm the increasing momentum towards systems change was evident – my week began with an excellent “morning of systems” convened by Agenda for Change highlighting a number of ongoing initiatives in this area  –  and served to build on July’s UN High-Level Political Forum and the associated SDG 6 synthesis report, underlining the imperative to strengthen governance, finance and capacity development if we are to achieve universal access.

So how does WSUP work to strengthen systems? From the outset, system-strengthening has been embedded in our Theory of Change: we partner with institutions and the private sector to develop effective service delivery models, and work in parallel to create the conditions for these services to be provided at the city level, including within low-income areas.

Read the complete article.

WASH and the Systems Approach – Water Currents, July 10, 2018

Water Currents: WASH and the Systems Approach – Water Currents, July 10, 2018.

The USAID Sustainable WASH Systems Learning Partnership (SWS) prepared this special issue of Water Currents focusing on systems approaches, which seek to understand the complexity, interactions, and interdependencies between actors and factors involved in water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH). systems

Actions are implemented based on this understanding and have the flexibility to adapt to feedback and changing conditions.

The purpose of SWS is to test new ideas, approaches, and tools to overcome barriers for improving WASH service sustainability via systems approaches. Additional information about SWS activities can be found on the SWS website.

Reports and webinars featured in this issue are from SWS and its consortium members, as well as the World Bank, USAID, and others.

2018 and 2017 Publications and Webinars 
Using Network Analysis to Understand and Strengthen WASH SystemsSWS, February 2018.

This webinar provides an introduction to network analysis and early lessons learned from analyses conducted in Ethiopia, Uganda, and Cambodia. SWS is using such analyses to better understand the complex interactions of actors in a local WASH system, with the ultimate goal of increasing the sustainability of WASH services.

Read the complete issue.

Swachh Bharat cities: What the parameters of cleanliness are

Swachh Bharat cities: What the parameters of cleanliness are. India Today, May 2018.

Housing and Urban Affairs Minister Hardeep Singh Puri released Swachh Survekshan 2018, the Modi government’s cleanliness and sanitation survey report.

While Jharkhand emerged as the best-performing state in terms of cleanliness, Indore in Madhya Pradesh was adjudged the cleanest city in the country, according to the survey released yesterday.

Swachh Survekshan – a survey conducted to rank cities on various sanitation and cleanliness parameters – was launched in 2016. It was conducted among 73 top cities of India.

It was followed by Swachh Survekshan 2017 that covered 434 cities.

The third round of Swachh Survekshan was conducted in January and February, covering all 4041 statutory towns in India.

Read the complete article.

Institutional triggering for improved sanitation in Uganda

Institutional triggering for improved sanitation in Uganda

CLTS Knowledge Hub at IDS, Published on May 10, 2018

Mujuni Kitimbo Jimmy (Field Officer, Ministry of Health, Uganda) talks about successes using ‘Institutional Triggering – an Advocacy Tool’ with Community Leaders resulting in improved sanitation for communities in Uganda.

This interview was filmed at the East and Southern Africa Regional Sharing and Learning Workshop on CLTS and Rural Sanitation 16 – 20 April 2018, Arusha, Tanzania.

The event was organised by the CLTS Knowledge Hub with support from SNV Tanzania. It was funded by the Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (Sida).

Promoting sanitation behaviour change in Tanzania

Promoting sanitation behaviour change in Tanzania

CLTS Knowledge Hub at IDS, Published on May 10, 2018

Anyitike Mwakitalima (Tanzania National Sanitation Campaign Coordinator) talks about the second phase of the campaign (2016 – 2020) that focuses on promoting drivers for nationwide behaviour change to improve household and public facility sanitation across the country.

This interview was filmed at the East and Southern Africa Regional Sharing and Learning Workshop on CLTS and Rural Sanitation 16 – 20 April 2018, Arusha, Tanzania.

The event was organised by the CLTS Knowledge Hub with support from SNV Tanzania. It was funded by the Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (Sida).

May 2018 UN report – SDG 6 Synthesis Report 2018 on Water and Sanitation

May 2018 UN report – SDG 6 Synthesis Report 2018 on Water and Sanitation

2018: Review of SDG 6 sdg

Member States follow-up and review the 2030 Agenda and its 17 goals every year at the High-level Political Forum (HLPF). This event facilitates the sharing of experiences, including successes, challenges and lessons learned.

Every year at the HLPF, an annual theme helps an increased focus along with an in-depth review on a selection of SDGs. In 2018, SDG 6 on water and sanitation is one of the goals to be reviewed.

To provide input to Member States on this goal, UN-Water has produced the SDG 6 Synthesis Report 2018 on Water and Sanitation (unedited version available here). This represents a joint position from the UN family on the global status on SDG 6 and other water-related targets.

The report also explores the linkages within SDG 6 targets and the interlinkages between SDG 6 and the other targets and indicators. The report builds on the baseline data on SDG 6 global indicators coming from JMP, GEMI and GLAAS.

Public Dialogue

From 2 May to 14 September 2018, the findings and the report will be discussed in a multi-stakeholder setting. Participants in the public dialogue will focus on giving feedback on the report, the main messages that will be brought to the HLPF and the way forward.

Join the conversation here.