Category Archives: Progress on Sanitation

Water Currents: Citywide Inclusive Sanitation

Water Currents: Citywide Inclusive Sanitation – October 23, 2018.

USAID is committed to exploring new ideas to achieving increased access to urban sanitation services.  The agency believes that sustainable sanitation requires that all stakeholders—from policymakers, the private sector, and utilities, to local NGOs, communities, and households—work together to achieve long-term solutions.

This issue of Water Currents includes articles, tools, and other resources related to Citywide Inclusive Sanitation (CWIS), an approach to urban sanitation that involves collaboration among many actors to ensure that everyone benefits from adequate sanitation service delivery outcomes. cwis

CWIS aims to help cities develop comprehensive approaches to sanitation improvement that encompass long-term planning, technical innovation, institutional reforms, and financial mobilization.

The concept of CWIS has been gaining traction among development practitioners. At World Water Week 2018 in Stockholm, the World Bank and other partners released an official Call to Action for all stakeholders to “embrace a radical shift in urban sanitation practices deemed necessary to achieve citywide inclusive sanitation.” This issue of Currents was compiled with help from the World Bank and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

Read the complete issue.

Bill Gates – Why the world deserves a better toilet

Why the world deserves a better toilet. GatesNotes, November 5, 2018.

I just traveled halfway around the world to look at a toilet.

If you’re a long-time reader of TGN, this shouldn’t come as a surprise. There are few things I love talking about more. Sanitation is one of the most important issues we work on. I even drank water made from human feces a couple years ago. gates

That’s why I’m so excited to visit Beijing, China this week for the Reinvented Toilet Expo, where some of the most high-tech toilets in the world will be on display.

The toilets at the expo aren’t just fascinating gadgets—they have the potential to save millions of lives. More than half of the world’s population uses unsafe sanitation facilities. Even in places where people have access to toilets or pit latrines, their waste isn’t disposed of safely. The pathogens from the waste find their way into the local water supply and makes people sick.

Read the complete article.

New U.S.-Supported ‘E-WASH’ Activity Will Bring Clean Water to Three Million Nigerians

Links to each of the news articles below are on the USAID in the News section of the Globalwaters.org website.

usaidnews

  • New U.S.-Supported ‘E-WASH’ Activity Will Bring Clean Water to Three Million Nigerians
  • Pakistani And U.S. Experts Conserve Water In Gomal Zam Dam Area
  • Grant Opportunity: Local Partnerships for the Transformation of Water Annual Program Statement
  • USAID Research: Agriculture Runoffs Creating Drug-Resistant Bacteria in Freshwater
  • Maji Mamas: Women Building Scaleable Water Construction Microfranchises

 

Water Currents: Citywide Inclusive Sanitation

Water Currents: Citywide Inclusive Sanitation, October 23, 2018.

USAID is committed to exploring new ideas to achieving increased access to urban sanitation services.  The agency believes that sustainable sanitation requires that all stakeholders—from policymakers, the private sector, and utilities, to local NGOs, communities, and households—work together to achieve long-term solutions.

This issue of Water Currents includes articles, tools, and other resources related to Citywide Inclusive Sanitation (CWIS), an approach to urban sanitation that involves collaboration among many actors to ensure that everyone benefits from adequate sanitation service delivery outcomes. CWIS aims to help cities develop comprehensive approaches to sanitation improvement that encompass long-term planning, technical innovation, institutional reforms, and financial mobilization. cwis

The concept of CWIS has been gaining traction among development practitioners. At World Water Week 2018 in Stockholm, the World Bank and other partners released an official Call to Action for all stakeholders to “embrace a radical shift in urban sanitation practices deemed necessary to achieve citywide inclusive sanitation.” This issue of Currents was compiled with help from the World Bank and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

Read the complete issue.

Sanitation and Water for All Tools Portal

Sanitation and Water for All Tools Portal swa

Looking for a tool to strengthen WASH in your country? To get started, select the Building Block or Action Point you want to explore below.

A set of filters will appear to the right. You will be able to narrow down your search by filtering the region/country, scope, subsector, language, and organization.

At any time, you may browse all tools or select another building block by clicking on the appropriate link in the horizontal menu above. You may also use the search box on the right to search by keyword.

Link to the portal.

Collective Efficacy: Development and Validation of a Measurement Scale for Use in Public Health and Development Programmes

Collective Efficacy: Development and Validation of a Measurement Scale for Use in Public Health and Development ProgrammesInt. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(10), 2139. ijerph-logo

Impact evaluations of water, sanitation, and hygiene interventions have demonstrated lower than expected health gains, in some cases due to low uptake and sustained adoption of interventions at a community level. These findings represent common challenges for public health and development programmes relying on collective action.

One possible explanation may be low collective efficacy (CE)—perceptions regarding a group’s ability to execute actions related to a common goal. The purpose of this study was to develop and validate a metric to assess factors related to CE. We conducted this research within a cluster-randomised sanitation and hygiene trial in Amhara, Ethiopia.

Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were carried out to examine underlying structures of CE for men and women in rural Ethiopia. We produced three CE scales: one each for men and women that allow for examinations of gender-specific mechanisms through which CE operates, and one 26-item CE scale that can be used across genders.

All scales demonstrated high construct validity. CE factor scores were significantly higher for men than women, even among household-level male-female dyads. These CE scales will allow implementers to better design and target community-level interventions, and examine the role of CE in the effectiveness of community-based programming.

Rapid monitoring and evaluation of a community-led total sanitation program using smartphones

Rapid monitoring and evaluation of a community-led total sanitation program using smartphones. Environmental Science and Pollution Research, September 2018.

India accounts for around 50% of the world’s open defecation, and under a World Bank initiative, a rural district was selected to be the first open defecation-free (ODF) district in Punjab. Considering this, the current study aims to evaluate the application and impact of a smartphone-based instant messaging app (IMA) on the process of making Fatehgarh Sahib an ODF district. smartphone

The District Administration involved the Water Supply and Sanitation Department, Non-government Organizations, and volunteers to promote the process of a community-led total sanitation. Proper training was provided to the volunteers to spread awareness about the triggering events, health impacts of open defecation, and monetary benefits of building new individual household latrine (IHHL).

IMA was used as an aid to speed up monitoring and for the evaluation of a sanitation program. All the volunteers were connected to an IMA. This helped in providing a transparent and evidence-based field report on triggering events, follow-up activities, validation of existing IHHL, and monitoring of construction of new IHHL.

IMA is a cost-effective tool as it is already being used by the volunteers and requires no additional cost (on the user or on the project) but requires a training on ethical uses of mobile and data safety.