Category Archives: Hygiene Promotion

Case Studies from Tanzania: Emotional Demonstrations of Handwashing with Soap at Vaccination Centres & Sustaining Open Defecation-Free Status

Case Studies from Tanzania: Emotional Demonstrations of Handwashing with Soap at Vaccination Centres & Sustaining Open Defecation-Free Status. SNV Tanzania, February 2019. snv

These case studies provide practical information for implementing innovative WASH interventions, and brief discussions on challenges and lessons learned by the SNV Tanzania team and their partners in communities.

Innovative approaches to sustain handwashing with soap and open defecation free status in rural communities in Tanzania

By SSH4A Tanzania

In Tanzania, SNV has developed, under the Sustainable Sanitation and Hygiene For All programme, two innovative approaches to sustain handwashing with soap and open defecation free status in rural communities. These are triggering with soap at vaccination centres and Jirani (neighbours) sanitation groups.

The first intervention consists of triggering at vaccination centres as they were found to be ideal places to raise awareness of the importance of washing hands with soap among pregnant women, mothers and other caregivers.

The second intervention is based on having neighbours who monitor the sanitation and hygiene progress of the households closest to their homes and sensitise other neighbours on the importance of building, taking care of, and improving sanitation and handwashing facilities.

The following case studies provide practical information for implementing the interventions, and brief discussions on the remaining challenges and lessons learned by the SNV team and their partners on the ground:

SSH4A Tanzania, 2019. Emotional demonstrations (emo-demos) of handwashing with soap at vaccination centres. Dar es Salaam, Tanzania: SNV Tanzania. 8 p. Download case study

SSH4A Tanzania, 2019. Jirani sanitation groups : sustaining open defecation free status in Tanzania. Dar es Salaam, Tanzania: SNV Tanzania Download case study

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Announcing the Global Handwashing Partnership’s New Resources Hub

The Global Handwashing Partnership is excited to share an updated Resources Hub on our website. This is an online, searchable repository of case studies, research and tools for handwashing with soap advocacy and implementation. ghp

The Resources Hub is open to submissions from handwashing practitioners and advocates. Simply follow our submission guidelines and upload handwashing materials here.

Facilitating handwashing where water is scarce – EAWAG

Facilitating handwashing where water is scarce – EAWAG, October 22, 2018.

Even though the water we’ve used for washing our hands is barely contaminated, it usually disappears down the drain, never to be used again. A newly developed system allows handwashing water to be recycled, thus not only saving water, but also helping to prevent infectious diseases in developing countries. eawag

Every year, according to WHO figures, around four million people die as a result of diarrhoeal diseases or respiratory infections. Particularly in developing countries, these deaths are largely attributable to poor hygiene – the problem would be significantly alleviated by regular handwashing.

But how can this be achieved in places where people lack access to safe water, or piped water is unavailable? This issue is being addressed by a group of environmental engineers led by ETH Professor Eberhard Morgenroth (Head of Process Engineering at Eawag), carrying out research as part of the Blue Diversion AUTARKY project.

They have now developed a grid-free treatment system allowing greywater – relatively clean wastewater from showering, bathing or handwashing – to be repeatedly recycled.

As Morgenroth points out, while commercial systems are already available which enable greywater to be treated on-site for use in toilet flushing, the recycled water does not meet the required quality standards to be used for other purposes.

Read the complete article.

Water access and sanitation shape birth outcomes and earning potential

Water access and sanitation shape birth outcomes and earning potential. Mongabay, November 8, 2018. mongabay.png

  • Spending more time per day fetching water increased Indian women’s risk of delivering a low birth weight baby, a study has said.
  • Open defecation and using a shared latrine within a woman’s building or compound were also associated with higher odds of low birth weight and pre-term births, respectively, compared to having a private household toilet.
  • The researchers believe that improving water, sanitation and health access and/or reducing gender-based harassment could reduce these adverse birth outcomes.
  • Another study pointed out that enhanced access to a reliable and proximate water supply reduced the time spent by women in collecting water and the proportion of hard labour performed by women. In addition, the thus freed may be spent on other income generating activities.

Read the complete article.

Surprise (or not)! Toy-in-soap intervention increases handwashing among kids in emergency contexts

Surprise (or not)! Toy-in-soap intervention increases handwashing among kids in emergency contexts. FHI360 Research, October 2018.

There is nothing more satisfying in life, for me, than being able to say: I never thought of it that way. The most game-changing innovations can often have seemingly common sense solutions, and we see these solutions popping up everywhere in peer-reviewed literature. soap.png

One of those published solutions jumped out at me this week as I read a Crowd 360 blog post about innovative hand hygiene interventions to celebrate Global Handwashing Day. Researchers from LSHTM, Save the Children and their partners published new evidence showing toys inside soap can increase handwashing among kids in emergency humanitarian contexts.

Studies have examined handwashing with soap in a variety of ways over the years – with adults, with young kids, and with older kids; with health-based messages, with nudges, and with motivational messages; in school-settings, and in stable, non-emergency settings. The new toy-in-soap study, however, is the first evaluation of its kind. Here I summarize why the study is different, what the authors found and why those findings matter.

Read the complete article.

WHO; IWA – Strengthening operations & maintenance through water safety planning

Strengthening operations & maintenance through water safety planning: A collection of case studies. WHO; IWA, September 2018. who

Strong operations and maintenance (O&M) programmes underpin the effectiveness and sustainability of drinking-water supply systems. Increased attention to and investment in O&M is needed to ensure that water safety and service delivery targets are consistently met and that public health is protected.

Water safety plans (WSPs) are a valuable tool to strengthen O&M programmes, and may contribute to improved O&M by supporting the systematic assessment, prioritization and management of risks from catchment to consumer, including those related to inadequate O&M.

This document presents case studies from lower and higher income settings around the world that highlight O&M benefits resulting from WSP implementation. These case studies contribute to a growing body of information on the outcomes of water safety planning and may be useful in building support for WSPs among water sector senior managers, operational staff and other stakeholders.