Category Archives: Economic Benefits

The latest updates to USAID’s Globalwaters.org & Global Waters on Medium

Below are some of the latest updates to USAID’s Globalwaters.org website and Global Waters on Medium

news

Blog Posts 

Global Waters on Medium

Resources

Water Currents

 

Toilet Board Coalition – Smart Sanitation City: The Sanitation Economy at City Scale

Smart Sanitation City: The Sanitation Economy at City Scale. Toilet Board Coalition, November 2018.

Smart Cities are reinventing how we design cities of the future. By 2050 68% of the world’s population will live in cities. Rapid urbanisation is leading to smarter cities that improve the lives of citizens through technology. Yet sanitation is rarely considered as a priority in smart city strategies. tbc.jpg

In India, the Government’s Smart Cities Mission launched in 2016 seeks to develop 100 cities across the country making them citizen friendly and sustainable.

There is a focus on efficiency, improved public services, goods, spaces, and modernisation of pubic services.

At the same time, in 2014 the Government of India launched its Swachh Bharat Mission with the objectives of eliminating open defecation through the construction of household-owned and community-owned toilets, while establishing an accountable mechanism of monitoring toilet use.

Linking the two national priorities presents a unique opportunity to make the sum greater than the whole of its parts.

Toilet Board Coalition – The Sanitation Economy in Agriculture

The Sanitation Economy in Agriculture: Sector Level Opportunities, New Toolbox, and Case Study. Toilet Board Coalition, November 2018.  tbc.jpg

Sanitation systems have a material impact on agriculture – on the soil, on the water, and
on the people who work and live on plantations. Improving sanitation in agricultural businesses will:

  • Improve the health of workers and their families, increasing well-being and
    productivity
  • Eliminate open defecation and environmental contamination of soil and
    ground-water
  • Reduce climate change impact through reduction of methane emissions

IWMI – Market adoption and diffusion of fecal sludge-based fertilizer in developing countries: cross-country analyses

Market adoption and diffusion of fecal sludge-based fertilizer in developing countries: cross-country analyses. IWMI, 2018.

The safe recovery of nutrients from our waste streams allows us to address the challenges of waste management and soil nutrient depletion conjointly.

Commercialization of waste-based organic fertilizers such as FortiferTM (fecal sludge-based co-compost) has the potential to generate significant benefits for developing economies via cost recovery for the sanitation sector and the provision of an alternative agricultural input for smallholder farmers. iwmi

To guide future FortiferTM businesses, this report presents examples of detailed market assessments, based on farmers’ perceptions, attitudes and willingness-to-pay (WTP) for a pelletized and non-pelletized FortiferTM co-compost.

The research was conducted in the Greater Accra and Western regions in Ghana, and in and around Kampala (Uganda), Bangalore (India), Hanoi (Vietnam), and Kurunegala (Sri Lanka).

Cross-country analyses helped to understand the effects of market drivers and, where possible, capture lessons learned for knowledge sharing.

The Collection of Resources on WASH Financing – Sanitation and Water for All

The Collection of Resources on WASH Financing. SWA, November 2018.

The SWA Secretariat has compiled this Collection with the main resources already available on sector financing. Many of these are linked to the SWA framework, processes and activities. swa

This Collection is developed and shared in response to an identified gap – the absence of a dedicated venue for resources that sector actors can use to strengthen their planning, implementation and review of progress on SDG financing.

The development and release of this Collection are timely, as the SWA increases its focus on country processes, and the Partnership embarks on the operationalisation of the revised Mutual Accountability Mechanism. Moreover, countries are moving from the stage of needs and gap assessment and towards finding and implementing solutions to fill the gaps.

At the same time, the SWA Partnership has seen some ‘success stories’ in which countries can increase political and financial priority for the WASH sector, while also coming up with innovative solutions for sector financing. These can provide inspiration for context-specific solutions.

 

USAID WASHPaLS Webinar Explores Barriers to Effective Sanitation Enterprises

USAID WASHPaLS Webinar Explores Barriers to Effective Sanitation Enterprises

The provision of sustainable sanitation for all is one of the world’s most important development priorities, yet 4.5 billion people lack access to a safe toilet. market-based-sanitation-blog.png

Past efforts to provide greater sanitation access, such as direct government provision and full, blanket subsidies for toilets, have proven to be ineffective or unsustainable in many developing countries, prompting some to focus on market-based sanitation (MBS) as an alternative.

However, market-based approaches have proven difficult to scale up.

Subhash Chennuri explores some of the barriers to scaling up MBS in “Designing Effective Sanitation Enterprises,” a recent webinar based on findings from a desk review of MBS development interventions from USAID’s Water, Sanitation and Hygiene Partnerships and Learning for Sustainability (WASHPaLS).

The review provides a new, more specific framework for understanding some of these barriers to scaling market-based sanitation.

Read the complete article.

 

Mobilizing Additional Funds for Pro-Poor Water Services: An Exploration of Potential Models to Finance Safe Water Access

Mobilizing Additional Funds for Pro-Poor Water Services: An Exploration of Potential Models to Finance Safe Water Access in Support of Sustainable Development Goal 6.1. Urban Institute;  Johns Hopkins University, the School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS), 2018.

This report seeks to draw from the experiences of other sectors to answer the following question:

Where, outside of tariffs, can governments in developing countries and their development partners raise additional resources to sustainably finance safely managed water services in line with SDG ambitions?

After an extensive literature review and stakeholder interviews, we narrowed our focus to look at three models that seemed most promising for a sustainable subsidy approach:

  • global philanthropy-led partnerships and funds
  • solidarity levies (surtaxes)
  • land value capture strategies

These three models have the potential to raise significant international and domestic resources, to fundamentally alter how donors and the private sector collaborate, and to yield reliable, automatic contributions without yearly renewals, allowing a longer planning and implementation horizon.