Category Archives: Economic Benefits

Factors Influencing Revenue Collection for Preventative Maintenance of Community Water Systems: A Fuzzy-Set Qualitative Comparative Analysis

Factors Influencing Revenue Collection for Preventative Maintenance of Community Water Systems: A Fuzzy-Set Qualitative Comparative Analysis. Sustainability, July 8, 2019.

Authors: Liesbet Olaerts, Jeffrey P. Walters, Karl G. Linden, Amy Javernick-Will and Adam Harvey

This study analyzed combinations of conditions that influence regular payments for water service in resource-limited communities. To do so, the study investigated 16 communities participating in a new preventive maintenance program in the Kamuli District of Uganda under a public–private partnership framework.

Overall, the findings from this study reveal distinct pathways of conditions that impact payment compliance and reflect the multifaceted nature of water point sustainability. Practically, the findings identify the processes needed for successful payment compliance, which include a strong WUC with proper support and training, user perceptions that the water quality is high and available in adequate quantities, ongoing support, and a lack of nearby water sources.

A comprehensive understanding of the combined factors that lead to payment compliance can improve future preventative maintenance programs, guide the design of water service arrangements, and ultimately increase water service sustainability.

USAID Global Water and Development Report of Water and Sanitation Activities FY 2017

Global Water and Development Report of Water and Sanitation Activities FY 2017. USAID, June 2019.

In the “Global Water and Development Report of Water and Sanitation Activities FY 2017,” USAID charts its progress toward achieving the goal of providing 15 million people with sustainable access to safe drinking water services and 8 million people with sustainable sanitation by 2022. usaid

In FY 2017, USAID provided $449.6 million to support water, sanitation, and hygiene activities in 41 countries. As a result, 3.6 million people gained access to improved water while 3.2 million gained access to improved sanitation.

The annual report also explores USAID’s support for partner countries on their journeys to self-reliance through many voices:

  • A community mobilizer in India marketing safe water kiosks to her neighbors
  • A homeowner in Indonesia who can now afford to build a septic tank system with funds from a community savings account
  • A mother in the Dominican Republic who has traded a wetland for the open sewer that used to run through her backyard
  • A regional water bureau manager in Ethiopia who can remotely monitor water point functionality through a data visualization platform

Blog 3 of 3: Accelerating improved sanitation in Africa through market based approaches

This is the final blog in the series, which is being released after AfricaSan 5 where the African sanitation community came together to assess progress against the Ngor commitments on Sanitation and Hygiene. Learning gained from the side-session on Market-based Rural Sanitation held on February 22nd also shapes this final blog.

Introduction

Blog one in this series was about the opportunities for market shaping in West and Central Africa and blog two shared the experience of the SHAWN project in Nigeria. This third blog looks at how market based sanitation (MBS) might be a means to accelerate the scale of improved sanitation uptake in Africa including amongst the poorest and most marginalised households and communities. It draws upon both the regional sanitation industry consultation (see report here) and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, UNICEF and USAID side-session on market based rural sanitation held as part of AfricaSan5. unicef

Recent reports have highlighted that neither MBS nor CLTS or other behaviour change approaches alone will be adequate for everyone, everywhere, all of the time (1, 2 and 3). It is increasingly recognised by practitioners that being effective calls for context-specific policies and practices that are less rigid or dogmatic about what approaches are used (4, 5 and 6). Interventions need to be flexible and adaptable and be designed with the priorities of target groups, including the products and services that they want, at the forefront. Furthermore, approaches need to be responsive to context and different stages of a programme both of which should inform decision-making (6).

Conducive contexts for MBS

With this in mind, which contexts are most conducive for MBS? Where and how can it be made more effective? Under what conditions are we most likely to find scenarios where the poorest and most vulnerable are climbing the sanitation ladder? And where is the market creating opportunities for people as consumers, entrepreneurs, and artisans?

A WaterAid-Plan-UNICEF joint rural sanitation guidance document (see document here) shared in Abuja and at AfricaSan5 recommends beginning with an analysis of the current sanitation situation, economic and social contexts, the physical environment and the enabling environment. Such an analysis forms the basis to determine what approaches will be appropriate for increasing basic sanitation in that particular context.

Read the complete article.

SUSTAINABLE WASH FINANCE SERIES: Private Sector, Will You Dance?

SUSTAINABLE WASH FINANCE SERIES: Private Sector, Will You Dance? by John Sauer, WASHfunders blog, 2018.

With 2020 on the doorstep, the global sanitation “toilet” community is becoming all too aware that without significant, annual changes in progress, there will be no way to meet the sustainable development goal 6.2, adequate sanitation for all, by 2030.

Sanitation was given a grade on Overseas Development Institute’s SDG Scorecard. One potential solution to close this gap lies in better engagement with the private sector by the sanitation sector. finance.png

At the moment, we find the private sector, both small, medium enterprises and larger corporations, literally standing on one side of the room waiting to be asked to dance. Meanwhile the sanitation sector continues to miss opportunities to step up and demonstrate the nerve to ask.

Missed Opportunities to Dance

A significant opportunity to create impact/disruption came back in 2015 when the World Bank published the Tapping the Markets report. This study highlighted the sanitation market’s potential just to reach basic sanitation in four countries valued at $2.6 billion.

Unsurprisingly, the research indicated that private sector would not enter the market due to high risk and the lack of R&D around affordable and desirable products and services that would enable private sector to earn enough profit.

Tapping the Markets gave solid recommendations that—with a few notable exceptions—the sanitation sector, represented by governments, multilaterals, donors, development banks, NGOs, and the private sector themselves have not adequately followed to achieve greater results.

Read the complete article.

The latest updates to USAID’s Globalwaters.org & Global Waters on Medium

Below are some of the latest updates to USAID’s Globalwaters.org website and Global Waters on Medium

news

Blog Posts 

Global Waters on Medium

Resources

Water Currents

 

Toilet Board Coalition – Smart Sanitation City: The Sanitation Economy at City Scale

Smart Sanitation City: The Sanitation Economy at City Scale. Toilet Board Coalition, November 2018.

Smart Cities are reinventing how we design cities of the future. By 2050 68% of the world’s population will live in cities. Rapid urbanisation is leading to smarter cities that improve the lives of citizens through technology. Yet sanitation is rarely considered as a priority in smart city strategies. tbc.jpg

In India, the Government’s Smart Cities Mission launched in 2016 seeks to develop 100 cities across the country making them citizen friendly and sustainable.

There is a focus on efficiency, improved public services, goods, spaces, and modernisation of pubic services.

At the same time, in 2014 the Government of India launched its Swachh Bharat Mission with the objectives of eliminating open defecation through the construction of household-owned and community-owned toilets, while establishing an accountable mechanism of monitoring toilet use.

Linking the two national priorities presents a unique opportunity to make the sum greater than the whole of its parts.

Toilet Board Coalition – The Sanitation Economy in Agriculture

The Sanitation Economy in Agriculture: Sector Level Opportunities, New Toolbox, and Case Study. Toilet Board Coalition, November 2018.  tbc.jpg

Sanitation systems have a material impact on agriculture – on the soil, on the water, and
on the people who work and live on plantations. Improving sanitation in agricultural businesses will:

  • Improve the health of workers and their families, increasing well-being and
    productivity
  • Eliminate open defecation and environmental contamination of soil and
    ground-water
  • Reduce climate change impact through reduction of methane emissions