Category Archives: Economic Benefits

Blog 3 of 3: Accelerating improved sanitation in Africa through market based approaches

This is the final blog in the series, which is being released after AfricaSan 5 where the African sanitation community came together to assess progress against the Ngor commitments on Sanitation and Hygiene. Learning gained from the side-session on Market-based Rural Sanitation held on February 22nd also shapes this final blog.

Introduction

Blog one in this series was about the opportunities for market shaping in West and Central Africa and blog two shared the experience of the SHAWN project in Nigeria. This third blog looks at how market based sanitation (MBS) might be a means to accelerate the scale of improved sanitation uptake in Africa including amongst the poorest and most marginalised households and communities. It draws upon both the regional sanitation industry consultation (see report here) and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, UNICEF and USAID side-session on market based rural sanitation held as part of AfricaSan5. unicef

Recent reports have highlighted that neither MBS nor CLTS or other behaviour change approaches alone will be adequate for everyone, everywhere, all of the time (1, 2 and 3). It is increasingly recognised by practitioners that being effective calls for context-specific policies and practices that are less rigid or dogmatic about what approaches are used (4, 5 and 6). Interventions need to be flexible and adaptable and be designed with the priorities of target groups, including the products and services that they want, at the forefront. Furthermore, approaches need to be responsive to context and different stages of a programme both of which should inform decision-making (6).

Conducive contexts for MBS

With this in mind, which contexts are most conducive for MBS? Where and how can it be made more effective? Under what conditions are we most likely to find scenarios where the poorest and most vulnerable are climbing the sanitation ladder? And where is the market creating opportunities for people as consumers, entrepreneurs, and artisans?

A WaterAid-Plan-UNICEF joint rural sanitation guidance document (see document here) shared in Abuja and at AfricaSan5 recommends beginning with an analysis of the current sanitation situation, economic and social contexts, the physical environment and the enabling environment. Such an analysis forms the basis to determine what approaches will be appropriate for increasing basic sanitation in that particular context.

Read the complete article.

SUSTAINABLE WASH FINANCE SERIES: Private Sector, Will You Dance?

SUSTAINABLE WASH FINANCE SERIES: Private Sector, Will You Dance? by John Sauer, WASHfunders blog, 2018.

With 2020 on the doorstep, the global sanitation “toilet” community is becoming all too aware that without significant, annual changes in progress, there will be no way to meet the sustainable development goal 6.2, adequate sanitation for all, by 2030.

Sanitation was given a grade on Overseas Development Institute’s SDG Scorecard. One potential solution to close this gap lies in better engagement with the private sector by the sanitation sector. finance.png

At the moment, we find the private sector, both small, medium enterprises and larger corporations, literally standing on one side of the room waiting to be asked to dance. Meanwhile the sanitation sector continues to miss opportunities to step up and demonstrate the nerve to ask.

Missed Opportunities to Dance

A significant opportunity to create impact/disruption came back in 2015 when the World Bank published the Tapping the Markets report. This study highlighted the sanitation market’s potential just to reach basic sanitation in four countries valued at $2.6 billion.

Unsurprisingly, the research indicated that private sector would not enter the market due to high risk and the lack of R&D around affordable and desirable products and services that would enable private sector to earn enough profit.

Tapping the Markets gave solid recommendations that—with a few notable exceptions—the sanitation sector, represented by governments, multilaterals, donors, development banks, NGOs, and the private sector themselves have not adequately followed to achieve greater results.

Read the complete article.

The latest updates to USAID’s Globalwaters.org & Global Waters on Medium

Below are some of the latest updates to USAID’s Globalwaters.org website and Global Waters on Medium

news

Blog Posts 

Global Waters on Medium

Resources

Water Currents

 

Toilet Board Coalition – Smart Sanitation City: The Sanitation Economy at City Scale

Smart Sanitation City: The Sanitation Economy at City Scale. Toilet Board Coalition, November 2018.

Smart Cities are reinventing how we design cities of the future. By 2050 68% of the world’s population will live in cities. Rapid urbanisation is leading to smarter cities that improve the lives of citizens through technology. Yet sanitation is rarely considered as a priority in smart city strategies. tbc.jpg

In India, the Government’s Smart Cities Mission launched in 2016 seeks to develop 100 cities across the country making them citizen friendly and sustainable.

There is a focus on efficiency, improved public services, goods, spaces, and modernisation of pubic services.

At the same time, in 2014 the Government of India launched its Swachh Bharat Mission with the objectives of eliminating open defecation through the construction of household-owned and community-owned toilets, while establishing an accountable mechanism of monitoring toilet use.

Linking the two national priorities presents a unique opportunity to make the sum greater than the whole of its parts.

Toilet Board Coalition – The Sanitation Economy in Agriculture

The Sanitation Economy in Agriculture: Sector Level Opportunities, New Toolbox, and Case Study. Toilet Board Coalition, November 2018.  tbc.jpg

Sanitation systems have a material impact on agriculture – on the soil, on the water, and
on the people who work and live on plantations. Improving sanitation in agricultural businesses will:

  • Improve the health of workers and their families, increasing well-being and
    productivity
  • Eliminate open defecation and environmental contamination of soil and
    ground-water
  • Reduce climate change impact through reduction of methane emissions

IWMI – Market adoption and diffusion of fecal sludge-based fertilizer in developing countries: cross-country analyses

Market adoption and diffusion of fecal sludge-based fertilizer in developing countries: cross-country analyses. IWMI, 2018.

The safe recovery of nutrients from our waste streams allows us to address the challenges of waste management and soil nutrient depletion conjointly.

Commercialization of waste-based organic fertilizers such as FortiferTM (fecal sludge-based co-compost) has the potential to generate significant benefits for developing economies via cost recovery for the sanitation sector and the provision of an alternative agricultural input for smallholder farmers. iwmi

To guide future FortiferTM businesses, this report presents examples of detailed market assessments, based on farmers’ perceptions, attitudes and willingness-to-pay (WTP) for a pelletized and non-pelletized FortiferTM co-compost.

The research was conducted in the Greater Accra and Western regions in Ghana, and in and around Kampala (Uganda), Bangalore (India), Hanoi (Vietnam), and Kurunegala (Sri Lanka).

Cross-country analyses helped to understand the effects of market drivers and, where possible, capture lessons learned for knowledge sharing.

The Collection of Resources on WASH Financing – Sanitation and Water for All

The Collection of Resources on WASH Financing. SWA, November 2018.

The SWA Secretariat has compiled this Collection with the main resources already available on sector financing. Many of these are linked to the SWA framework, processes and activities. swa

This Collection is developed and shared in response to an identified gap – the absence of a dedicated venue for resources that sector actors can use to strengthen their planning, implementation and review of progress on SDG financing.

The development and release of this Collection are timely, as the SWA increases its focus on country processes, and the Partnership embarks on the operationalisation of the revised Mutual Accountability Mechanism. Moreover, countries are moving from the stage of needs and gap assessment and towards finding and implementing solutions to fill the gaps.

At the same time, the SWA Partnership has seen some ‘success stories’ in which countries can increase political and financial priority for the WASH sector, while also coming up with innovative solutions for sector financing. These can provide inspiration for context-specific solutions.