Author Archives: WSUP

New call for researchers (WSUP – Urban Sanitation Research Initiative)

Evaluation of user experience outcomes of Clean Team service use

Focus country: Ghana

This research project is commissioned under the Urban Sanitation Research Initiative, a 2017−2020 research programme core-funded by UK aid from the British people and managed by Water & Sanitation for the Urban Poor (WSUP). This research project will deliver an evaluation of the user experience outcomes of being a customer of Clean Team Ghana.

Clean Team Ghana is a social enterprise providing container-based toilets for a monthly fee covering toilet rental and the container replacement service. Clean Team Ghana currently operates in the city of Kumasi. It has about 1500 customers, and is recruiting new customers at a rate of about 300 per month. This research will aim to generate evidence that is: a) of wide value in Ghana and internationally for understanding the user experience impacts of container-based sanitation service models of this type, and b) of specific value to Clean Team Ghana in further improving their business model.

The research should focus on user experience including i) satisfaction with aspects including for example smell and container replacement service, and ii) subjective wellbeing across a range of dimensions including dignity and security. We anticipate a longitudinal design, with customers interviewed just before service start, soon after service start, and 6 months after service start.

Maximum budget under this Call: GBP 80,000 inclusive of VAT
Bids due: Before UK 1700 hours on 4th March 2019.

For more information visit: https://www.wsup.com/research/open-calls/

The devastating impact of poor wastewater management

In this World Toilet Day blog, Neil Jeffery, Chief Executive of Water & Sanitation for the Urban Poor (WSUP), looks into the impact of poor wastewater treatment and highlights ways in which cities can improve sanitation management.

When people in the most developed cities flush the toilet, they have the luxury of not having to wonder where the wastewater goes to next.

They know, if they stop to think for a second, that it gets flushed into a sewer, probably running under the main road, joining larger and larger sewers until it ends up in a treatment plant. At this point, water gets treated and ends back – somehow – in the water system.

Maybe, years later, that water will come back to the same house, perhaps to be used in a sink, or shower.

But we don’t need to worry about all this. It just happens, and our sanitation systems works – by and large – in harmony with the wider ecosystem.

It is not so simple, though, in many other countries. The lack of a sewer system outside of central urban areas means that vast quantities of wastewater is simply not treated.

And this, in turn, results in sanitation waste being abundant in urban communities – with a devastating impact on health, dignity, education and economic development.

Read the full article here.

Call for researchers: Modelling faecal pathogen flows in urban environments

This research project is commissioned under the Urban Sanitation Research Initiative, a 2017-2020 research programme core-funded by UK aid from the British people, and managed by Water & Sanitation for the Urban Poor (WSUP).

The research will develop, apply and validity-test a modelling approach for understanding faecal pathogen flows within a defined urban location (in Bangladesh, Ghana, Kenya, Madagascar, Mozambique or Zambia). This will likely require significant on-site data collection to feed the model and to test its validity.

A possible modelling framework has already been developed in an earlier concept study under the Urban Sanitation Research Initiative, but we are open to considering other frameworks and approaches (more information about this framework can be found within the Call itself).

While this research aims to develop an internationally useful modelling approach, we would also expect it to be useful and influential in the specific location in which it is developed.

Maximum budget under this Call: GBP 250,000 inclusive of VAT

Bids due: Before 1700 hours on 22nd October 2018

Focus country: One of Bangladesh, Ghana, Kenya, Madagascar, Mozambique or Zambia

More information can be found in the Research Call.

Queries and clarifications can be sent to erl [at] wsup [dot com].

Call for researchers: Increasing the impact of school-based hygiene promotion programmes in Madagascar

This research project, commissioned under WSUP’s Urban Sanitation Research Initiative with funding from Dubai Cares, will use a formative research approach to explore barriers and opportunities for improved school WASH in Madagascar. The over-arching aim of this research is to contribute to the evidence base required to improve and expand Madagascar’s existing WASH Friendly Schools programme (Ecoles Amies de WASH).

The research should aim to identify a feasible adjustment to the current programme model, which generates a sustained increase (by comparison with the existing model as currently applied) in the prevalence of key hygiene behaviours, among schoolchildren exposed to the programme and among members of their households. This will involve a) literature review and formative research to identify one or two adjustments to the current model, which can plausibly be expected to achieve better outcomes; and b) rigorous comparative evaluation of outcomes achieved in implementation of the existing model and adjusted models. Implementation will be funded and managed by WSUP.

The research may be led by a Madagascan or non-Madagascan organisation, but in either case this work will require strong Madagascan involvement in research design and delivery.

More information can be found in the Call here.

Maximum budget under this Call: GBP 65,000

Bids due: 23rd July 2018

Focus country: Madagascar

Languages: French (req’d), English (optional), Malagasy (optional)

RESEARCH CALL: Exploratory research on increasing the impact of school-based hygiene promotion programmes in Madagascar

This research project, commissioned under WSUP’s Urban Sanitation Research Initiative with funding from Dubai Cares, will use a formative research approach to explore barriers and opportunities for improved school WASH in Madagascar. The over-arching aim of this research is to contribute to the evidence base required to improve and expand Madagascar’s existing WASH Friendly Schools programme (Ecoles Amies de WASH). The research should aim to identify a feasible adjustment to the current programme model, which generates a sustained increase (by comparison with the existing model as currently applied) in the prevalence of key hygiene behaviours, among schoolchildren exposed to the programme and among members of their households.

This will involve a) literature review and formative research to identify one or two adjustments to the current model, which can plausibly be expected to achieve better outcomes; and b) rigorous comparative evaluation of outcomes achieved in implementation of the existing model and adjusted models. Implementation will be funded and managed by WSUP.

The research may be led by a Madagascan or non-Madagascan organisation, but in either case this work will require strong Madagascan involvement in research design and delivery. Some deliverables will need to be in French, some can be in English; internal communications with WSUP may be in French or English, as preferred by the successful bidder.

For more information, see the Research Call here.

Maximum budget under this Call: GBP 65,000
Bids due: Before Madagascar 1700 hours on Tuesday 19th June 2018, to erl [at] wsup [dot com].

Public Finance for WASH: update

Public Finance for WASH has moved: we’ve changed our URL! We’re now at https://www.publicfinanceforwash.org/

Public finance and domestic resource mobilisation are absolutely critical for reaching SDG 6. At Public Finance for WASH, a partnership initiative between IRC and WSUP, we remain focused on documenting equitable public finance models in the WASH sphere, aiming to provide a knowledge resource that can help the sector to identify transferable solutions. From the WSUP side, this is being supported by various research projects relating to public finance, under our Urban Sanitation Research Initiative: for example, check out our recent Policy Brief reporting a study of the willingness of Kenyan water utility customers to pay a little bit extra on their water bill to support slum sanitation. From the IRC side, we continue working to document, train and advocate at global and country level, to ensure that more money is disbursed for direct support and the enabling environment, while at the same time aiming for more efficiency in public administration and performance measurement in the WASH public sector.

If you want to work with us in any way, get in touch: pf4wash[at] gmail [dot] com!

WSUP webinar: demystifying the enabling environment for urban sanitation

Demystifying the enabling environment for urban sanitation: case studies from Bangladesh, Kenya and Zambia 

Tuesday 10th April, 1pm – 2.30pm BST

Register here

WSUP is hosting a webinar to explore what an enabling environment for urban sanitation really looks like. Despite its evident importance to achieving scale, the components of a well-functioning enabling environment for urban sanitation are weakly understood.

Join us on April 10th to hear how we are working to strengthen enabling environments across WSUP locations.

Speakers:
Amirul Hasan, WSUP Business Development Lead, Dhaka (Bangladesh)
Sibongile Ndaba, WSUP Business Development Lead, Lusaka (Zambia)
Emanuel Owako, WSUP Project Manager, Kisumu (Kenya)

This webinar will share the lessons from a 5-year programme – funded by Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation – which aimed to catalyse the market for on-site sanitation services in Bangladesh, Kenya and Zambia, through the development of flexible public-private arrangements.

We will begin the session by introducing a new framework for conceptualising and evaluating the enabling environment, grounded in WSUP’s experience of implementing urban WASH programmes in six countries.

Our speakers will then share their experiences of strengthening key components of the local enabling environment – ranging from institutional mandates, regulatory effectiveness and service provider capacity to infrastructure, technology, affordability and consumer behaviour.

Participants will also be introduced to “The Bottom Line”: a new online simulation which brings to life some of the challenges faced by sanitation businesses.

Click here to register.