Author Archives: usaidwaterckm

Water Quality – Water Currents, February 12, 2019

Water Quality – Water Currents, February 12, 2019

Globally, at least 2 billion people use a drinking water source contaminated with feces. More than 1,300 children under 5 years of age die every day from diarrhea linked to unsafe water and poor sanitation. The U.S. Government Global Water Strategy and the USAID Water and Development Plan in support of the strategy include a focus on increasing sustainable access to safe drinking water, recognizing it as crucial to lifting people out of poverty and especially important for unlocking educational and economic opportunities for women and girls. waterquality

This issue of Water Currents looks at water quality—specifically drinking water—and includes research and technical resources on water safety plans, water quality monitoring, and chemical and microbial hazards in water. A special thanks goes out to the staff of Sattva for contributing to this issue. Sattva is a key member of the SAFEBillion initiative, a collaborative effort to create solutions for access to clean drinking water, free from arsenic and fluoride.

Standards and Guidance
Guidelines for Drinking-Water Quality (GDWQ)World Health Organization (WHO), 2017. This is the fourth edition of the Guidelines and it builds on over 50 years of guidance by WHO on drinking-water quality. The report also includes fact sheets on a broad range of chemicals that can affect water quality.

Developing Drinking-Water Quality Regulations and StandardsWHO, 2018. This document provides practical guidance to support the development or revision of customized national or subnational drinking water quality regulations and standards.

Safely Managed Drinking Water: Thematic Report on Drinking Water 2017WHOUNICEF, 2017. WHO/UNICEF’s Joint Monitoring Programme for Water Supply and Sanitation (JMP) introduced “safely managed drinking water services” as a new standard of drinking water quality in its 2017 report, which examines this new designation in the context of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

Read the complete issue.

 

Global Waters – Turning on the Water: USAID Collaborates with Local Partners to Restore Water Access to Northeast Syria

Turning on the Water: USAID Collaborates with Local Partners to Restore Water Access to Northeast Syria. Global Waters, February 8, 2019.

“It really is an exciting thing to turn back on the water,” says USAID’s Development Advisor David Isaak. “It gives communities some sense of normalcy, that things are coming back to life.”

Before the outbreak of war in 2011, millions of Syrians had their water consistently delivered through a vast network of pipes and thousands of large-scale pumps. Nearly all Syrians enjoyed access to potable water, and massive man-made canals irrigated the arid northeastern countryside, which facilitated a productive agricultural economy.

syria

USAID’s Syria Essential Services (SES II) project helped rehabilitate this well in southwest Syria and installed solar panels to power the pumps. Photo credit: USAID/SES II

The conflict took a heavy toll on the country’s infrastructure, often deliberately as a tool of war: aerial campaigns and/or improvised explosive devices targeted miles of water networks and destroyed thousands of water pumps. Other water pumps were simply abandoned after the massive civilian exodus.

Read the complete article in USAID’s Global Waters Stories.

New Sanitation Market Shaping Blog Series! Read the first of 3 blogs ‘Opportunities for market shaping in West and Central Africa’

New Sanitation Market Shaping Blog Series! Read the first of 3 blogs Opportunities for market shaping in West and Central Africa’

This series of three blogs is based on discussions about market shaping held at a regional sanitation industry consultation in Abuja, Nigeria, convened by UNICEF’s West and Central Africa Regional Office. clts

This first blog outlines how UNICEF and partners are rising to the challenge, recognising the need to expand market-based approaches to sanitation to fulfil the SDG ambition to improve the quality and sustainability of services.

It then reflects on a sanitation market assessment in Ghana, Nigeria and Cote d’Ivoire which was validated at the industry consultation where a set of opportunities for strengthening sanitation market systems were developed.

Frontiers 12: Rural Sanitation in Africa: Challenges, Good Practices and Ways Forward

Frontiers 12: Rural Sanitation in Africa: Challenges, Good Practices and Ways Forward In order to achieve universal safely managed sanitation across Africa by 2030 the scale and pace will need to increase drastically. clts

This edition of Frontiers of CLTS draws on the discussions held across two regional Africa events in 2018, highlighting the challenges faced by programme implementers (both government and non-government staff) at different levels in relation to the Ngor Commitments and the achievement of universal access to safely managed sanitation.

A range of initiatives are presented that show promise in addressing these challenges, along with recommended priority actions.

WASH Weekly Research Updates 2019

Dear Colleagues:

The USAID Water CKM team prepares an informal bulletin each week with some of the most recent WASH-related research and these are archived on a Google Document. Please let us know if you find this useful or contact us if you wish to subscribe to the weekly updates.

FEBRUARY 4, 2019

BLOG POSTS

How Humans Get in the Way of Clean Water. Scientific American, Jan 26. There are many cheap and effective ways to provide safe water to the world’s poor regions. But projects often fail due to inadequate planning, maintenance or persuasive power.

Taking Concrete Actions to Leave No One Behind: Government of Ghana Pro-Poor Policies and Sanitation Guidelines for Targeting the Poor and Vulnerable. Global Communities, Jan 8. Global Communities Ghana, with funding from USAID, as part of the WASH for Health project has been collaborating with the Government of Ghana Ministry of Sanitation and Water Resources to develop Guidelines for Targeting the Poor and Vulnerable for Basic Sanitation Services in Ghana, published in 2018, to provide guidance for targeting poor and vulnerable populations.

The economics of antimicrobial resistance and the role of water and sanitation services. WASHeconomics, Jan 21. Seeing a paper published a few weeks ago in Nature Communications (more on that below) reminded me of some reading I did last year on WASH and antimicrobial resistance (AMR), and got me thinking about the economics of this.

Menstrual health programs need a new focus in developing world, critic says. Washington Post, Jan 13. In her new book, “The Managed Body: Developing Girls and Menstrual Health in the Global South,” she contends that programs to provide pads and cups to girls in developing countries — also known collectively as the Global South — miss the mark, well-intentioned though they may be. They overlook higher priorities, such as clean water and comprehensive education efforts, she says, and actually work against eradicating taboos surrounding menstruation.

REPORTS

WASH and Health working together: a ‘how to guide’ for NTD programmes. WHO, January 2019. This toolkit provides step-by-step guidance to NTD programme managers and partners on how to engage and work collaboratively with the WASH community to improve delivery of water, sanitation and hygiene services to underserved population affected by many neglected tropical diseases.

WASH Innovation Catalogue. Elrha, Jan 2019. Our WASH Innovation Catalogue is the first of its kind. It offers a unique overview of some of the most promising new solutions in WASH, and is designed to help practitioners decide which innovations could help them solve their most pressing problems. Taking an innovation from idea to scale can take years, and the innovations featured in this catalogue are all at different stages on that journey, but what this offers the WASH sector now is a look at the exciting work happening around the world to address common challenges.

Continue reading

Amid Neglected Diseases is a Neglected Solution – Helen Hamilton, WaterAid

Amid Neglected Diseases is a Neglected Solution – By Helen Hamilton

Neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) are called neglected for a reason: they’re widespread, painful and debilitating and, at times deadly diseases that prey on the poorest people; yet most are preventable.

Soil-transmitted helminths – intestinal worms such as hookworm, roundworm and whipworm – infect 1.5 billion people, more than half of whom are children¹. Schistosomiasis is endemic in 70 developing countries, with the vast majority of individuals infected located in Sub-Saharan Africa². 190 million people are at-risk of developing trachoma – a disease that is the single most preventable cause of blindness worldwide³ and responsible for an estimated $2.9 to $6 billion in global losses in productivity annually.

These are just three of over 20 diseases that make up this grouping of NTDs which take a devastating toll on human health, quality of life, livelihoods and national economies, particularly for those in the bottom billion, across 149 countries.

Amidst the devastation brought on by these neglected diseases is a neglected solution. Strong evidence shows that access to safe, sustainable and reliable water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) interventions plays a critical role in preventing transmission.

Read the complete article.

 

Water, Sanitation & Hygiene Innovation Catalogue – Elrha, January 2019

Water, Sanitation & Hygiene Innovation Catalogue – Elrha, January 2019.

We are proud to present this catalogue as a collection of some of the most promising new solutions in WASH, offering the WASH practitioner community a unique opportunity to access over 30 innovations that could help to solve their most pressing problems.

Our WASH Innovation Catalogue is the first of its kind. It offers a unique overview of some of the most promising new solutions in WASH, and is designed to help practitioners decide which innovations could help them solve their most pressing problems. elrha

Taking an innovation from idea to scale can take years, and the innovations featured in this catalogue are all at different stages on that journey, but what this offers the WASH sector now is a look at the exciting work happening around the world to address common challenges.

The WASH Innovation Catalogue is written with and for humanitarian WASH practitioners and researchers. Our aim is for all innovations in the catalogue to appeal to and be understood by both WASH generalists and specialists.

We want both senior and less experienced WASH practitioners to be able to engage with any of the featured innovations and assess if they are relevant for solving their local or global challenges. The catalogue therefore assumes a certain level of understanding of WASH but includes highly technical terms only where this is essential for understanding the innovation concerned.