Author Archives: Sustainable Sanitation Alliance (SuSanA)

Thematic Discussion: Private sector engagement in sanitation and hygiene

Join the Water Supply and Sanitation Collaborative Council Community of Practice on Sanitation and Hygiene in Developing Countries (WSSCC CoP) and the global Sustainable Sanitation Alliance (SuSanA) in a joint 3-week thematic discussion on engaging the local private sector in sanitation and hygiene.  

For more information, please click here to visit the discussion on the SuSanA Forum.

Unbenannt

1. Introduction

Sanitation and hygiene interventions have the objective of ending open defecation and enabling access to safe sanitation by households.  This is reflected in the SDG target 6.2 which aims to “achieve access to adequate and equitable sanitation and hygiene for all by 2030”.Sanitation marketing is applicable to both rural and urban settings and combines a behaviour change communication component to encourage the adoption of improved and hygienic latrines with a commercial component for developing the right products and services for consumers that are accessible to households at affordable price points.Sanitation marketing therefore requires strong partnerships and coordination of various government departments, development partners, entrepreneurs and financiers with households/consumers at the centre.

Split into three inter-linked and sequenced sub-themes that explore links between research and practice, the discussion focuses on how and under what circumstances local private sector engagement can ensure sustained health and WASH outcomes. Thematic experts will frame and prompt debates each week as follows:

Theme 1: Raising demand for sanitation and hygiene services: will focus on working with the private sector to raise demand through sanitation marketing and financing options including access to household credit, financing for local entrepreneurs or via other means.
We are keen to explore forum members’ insights and experiences on the following:
  1. Considering the SDG target 6.2, how can sanitation marketing approaches be designed most effectively to increase the percentage of populations using safely managed sanitation services in urban and rural settlements?  What are appropriate roles for the local private sector in supporting these efforts?
  2. Experience and formative marketing research has shown that households do not prioritise sanitation financing.  How do we structure micro-credit financing to make it attractive for households to take small loans for sanitation?
  3. In both rural and urban settings, how do we best link CLTS and sanitation marketing in practice and what sequencing of interventions is required?
  4. What approaches to finance can help low-income urban settlements to access safely managed sanitation services?  What are the enablers and barriers to this?

Theme 2: Meeting demand at the household level:will focus on engaging local entrepreneurs to respond to demand through local entrepreneur engagement around toilet construction and emptying.

Theme 3: Engaging private sector further along the chain: will focus on local private sector roles in transport, disposal and reuse

2. Thematic Timeline

  • Theme I: October 26-November 1: Raising demand for sanitation and hygiene services
  • Theme II: November 2-8: Meeting demand at household level
  • Theme III: November 9-15: Engaging private sector further along the chain

For each area, key questions revolve around the business models and financing options that hold promise, the role of government and external agencies in enabling and supporting enterprise development, and the design of appropriate regulation for small and medium enterprises.

3. Experts

  • Dr Amaka Godfrey, WEDC Loughborough University
  • Lillian Mbeki, Consultant
  • Emily Endres, Senior Program Associate, Results for Development Institute
  • Dr. Nicola Greene, Consultant
  • Hung Anh Ta, PhD Candidate, Asian Institute of Technology
  • Magdalena Bäuerl, Project Officer, hydrophil
  • Andreas Knapp, Managing Director, hydrophil
  • Ken Caplan, Director, Partnerships in Practice (Discussion Co-ordinator)

4. Background Readings

Theme I: Raising demand for sanitation and hygiene

Unicef (2010): Sanitation Marketing in Indonisia: http://www.unicef.org/wash/files/6._Sanitation_Marketing_Training_Module.pdf

Water and Sanitation Programme (2014): Scaling up Rural Sanitation: https://www.wsp.org/sites/wsp.org/files/publications/WSP-EAP-Council-Flyer-FY13.pdf

SNF / UNICEF (2013): Rural Kenya Market Research on Sustainable Sanitation Products and Solutions for Low Income Households: http://www.snvworld.org/en/countries/kenya/publications/rural-kenya-market-research-on-sustainable-sanitation-products-and

Australian Wash Working Group: Sanitation Marketing Community of Practice – developing skills to build sanitation markets: http://www.sanitationmarketing.com/

Join the discussion here via SuSanA and via the WSSCC COP !

Sarphati Sanitation Awards 2015 – Get to know the Nominees

Sarphati

Creating innovative solutions to solve the worldwide sanitation problem is what connects the four aspiring nominees for the Sarphati Sanitation Award for Young Entrepreneurs 2015. They are all inspirational examples of how the challenge of providing proper sanitation for everyone can be tackled, simply (Goal #6 of the Sustainable Development Goals) by taking a business approach.

In 2013, World Waternet, Netherlands Water Partnership (NWP) and Aqua for All initiated the biennial Sarphati Sanitation Award (SSA) to honor the outstanding contribution of individuals or organizations to the global sanitation challenge through entrepreneurship.
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SuSanA and IRC online thematic discussion: Sustainable urban sanitation – moving forward

We are happy to announce that IRC is holding a 2-week thematic discussion on the topic “Sustainable urban sanitation – moving forward” on the SuSanA online discussion Forum starting from today.

To view the discussion and post, visit:

SuSanA forum: http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/218-thematic-discussion-sustainable-urban-sanitation-moving-forward

The overall theme of this thematic discussion is how to move towards more sustainable urban sanitation. The idea is to initiate a discussion from the perspective of the whole sanitation chain and also the role (or lack of role) which local government has as leaders for change in sanitation. The discussion would focus on case study examples which have worked but also those that have not worked and how these could have been improved given the chance with a focus on the whole sanitation chain. Guiding questions by the thematic experts will help to structure the discussion throughout this e-debate.

Theme 1 (October 13-19): Lack of attention to the whole sanitation chain: Why is there a lack of attention to the whole sanitation chain? Given that sanitation is more than building a toilet and includes changed hygienic behaviours, maintenance, emptying, treatment and disposal or reuse of accumulated faecal matter, why are so many programmes and project still only looking at one possible two sides of this multi-sided chain?

Theme 2 (October 20-23): Lack of leadership for change around sanitation: Sanitation improvements are not the sole responsibility of one entity but is shared between households, private service providers (latrine builders, emptying companies) and/or various line ministries (Min. of Health, Education, Infrastructure, Environment). How can we create a sanitation sector that is more coordinated and aligned with the many players as well providing a supportive and regulatory function? The latter is typically the responsibility of national and local governments. However, in many countries, either there is not a unique institution with the overall responsibility for sanitation, or this designated institution is weak and is not able to lead the sector towards change. Is there a means of creating more substantive governmental leadership in this area for better coordination and harmonisation in the sanitation sector?

The first theme has started today by Cor Dietvorst explainingWhat are we talking about? Systemic change is change that encompasses all parts of a system, taking into account the interrelationships and interdependencies among those parts whereas piecemeal change focuses on one or several parts of a system and thereby addresses only pieces of the urban sanitation problem.”

And asking:

1.What are your views on using the systemic change approach for addressing the (urban) sanitation challenges?

  1. Is it justifiable to continue focusing on onsite containment of human faeces and thereby ignoring all the other links of the sanitation chain? 
  2. How can we balance the need for systemic long-time change with addressing some of the immediate urgent needs?

We warmly invite you to engage with us in the discussion. Experts from the sector will be providing their input and respond to your questions:

  • Erick Baetings (Senior sanitation expert, IRC)
  • Marielle Snel (Senior expert, IRC)
  • Cor Dietvorst (Programme officer, IRC)

BACKGROUND

This discussion is the third in a series of events on urban sanitation co-hosted by IRC. The first in the series was the thematic discussion “Urban Sanitation Finance – From Macro to Micro Level” in June, followed by a Round Table Discussion on Urban Sanitation in line with ULCTS in July and the IRC Event “Working towards sustainable urban sanitation” held in September. Recommended background readings for the discussion are provided here

We look forward to hearing your contributions on this discussion!

SuSanA and WSSCC online thematic discussion: Sanitation and hygiene behaviour change programming and sustainability

The Water Supply and Sanitation Collaborative Council Community of Practice on Sanitation and Hygiene in Developing Countries (WSSCC CoP) and the global Sustainable Sanitation Alliance (SuSanA) are holding a joint 3-week thematic discussion on sanitation and hygiene behaviour change programming and sustainability starting on 22nd September:

Sanitation and hygiene behaviour change programming and sustainability: habit formation, slippage, and the need for long-term programming

The thematic discussion will take place concurrently on both platforms; with a coordinator ensuring that content is shared across both communities. The discussion will be split into three inter-linked sub-themes to further explore how behaviour change can be better understood and improved to ensure health and WASH outcomes are sustained. Thematic experts will frame and prompt debates each week on:

22-28 September – Theme 1: Programming for scale – What are some examples of successful scale-up? How did these models address the issues of inclusion and equity? In the cases of successful scale-up, were programmes initiated and sustained by governmental or non-governmental actors? What is the role of the private sector in implementing sanitation at scale?

28 Sep – 05 Oct – Theme 2: Sustainability for behaviour change – How can behaviour change become systematised and sustained? What are the behavioural determinants and behaviour change techniques we should be aware of? What constitutes an enabling environment for sustainability?

05-12 October – Theme 3: ODF and slippage – How is ODF defined? What are some of the local strategies in place to strengthen sustainability of ODF – within communities and beyond? What are the patterns of slippage? How and when can slippage be monitored in large-scale programmes? Are there more innovative ways looking at not only the physically visible aspects – what about the health impact and the perceptions and views of communities?

Join us for the discussion with some of the following thematic experts:

  • Tracey Keatman, Partnerships in Practice (Coordinator)
  • Suvojit Chattopadhyay, Consultant, focused on Monitoring and Evaluation
  • Mr. Poy Dy, Project Coordinator of Santi Sena (SSO), GSF sub-grantee, Cambodia
  • CLTS Knowledge Hub, Institute of Development Studies, University of Sussex
  • Clara Rudholm, Senior Programme Officer, Global Sanitation Fund
  • Carolien van der Voorden, Senior Programme Officer, Global Sanitation Fund
  • Matilda Jerneck, Programme Officer, Global Sanitation Fund

Weekly summaries of discussions will be posted on the SuSanA and CoP platforms as well as a synthesis report of overarching findings at the end.

To participate in the discussion, please join here:

SuSanA Forum: http://forum.susana.org/forum/categories/209-thematic-discussion-sanitation-and-hygiene-behaviour-change-programming-for-scale-and-sustainability

And

WSSCC CoP: https://www.linkedin.com/grp/home?gid=1238187 

We look forward to some constructive and in-depth discussions!

SuSanA thematic discussion: Sustainable Development Goals – enough to end the sanitation crisis?

SDG

The Sustainable Sanitation Alliance (SuSanA), in partnership with End Water Poverty, is holding a 2 week thematic discussion on exploring whether the new SDG indicators on sanitation will address the gaps left by the MDGs and what the SDGs can do differently to ensure those most in need have their human right to water and sanitation realised.
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Overview of sustainable sanitation events at the World Water Week in Stockholm

FlyerThe Secretariat of the Sustainable Sanitation Alliance (SuSanA) has compiled a flyer of all SuSanA events and partner of SuSanA events during the World Water Week which is now available for download. This will help you to get an overview of many exciting sessions and events around sustainable sanitation!

For all those, who are not able to go to Stockholm, we will livestream the 20th SuSanA meeting on Saturday 22 August.

Please follow this link for more information and to watch the livestream: http://www.susana.org/en/events/susana-meetings/2015/421-20th-susana-meeting-Stockholm

Discussion on a new SNV/ISF learning paper on “Septage Transfer Stations”

On Wednesday 24 June a discussion on a new SNV/ISF learning paper, namely on Septage Transfer Stations, is starting. This discussion will be running on the Faecal sludge transport sub-category of the sanitation systems group category on the SuSanA Forum and in parallel also on the WASH Asia urban san Dgroup.

The topic of Septage Transfer Stations has come up as one of the learning priorities, because it is an essential part of a faecal sludge management solution in cities with narrow roads and large distances to treatment facilities. In this learning paper we brought together existing knowledge on this topic, and we found out that there are only a few good examples. Through this discussion we are not only hoping to share the paper, but also to add examples and insight to it from your collective experience.

What will we discuss?

There will be 3 topics and each topic will run for one week, from Wednesday till Tuesday. At the end of the discussion, we’ll make a summary paper as input for the workshop. Below are the three topics.

Week dates topic

Week 1: 24 June- 30 June Different options for septage transfer stations

Week 2: 1 July- 7 July General considerations for septage transfer stations

Week 3: 8 July-14 July Reflections on management arrangements for septage transfer stations

After the discussion, we will share an updated version of the learning paper on Septage Transfer Stations.

How does it work?

We are making the full learning paper available to you on the Faecal sludge transport subgroup and the SuSanA Discussion Forum.

In addition to this, we will break up the information according to the above blocks. On the first day of the discussion, 24 June, you will find some questions in your inbox. Everybody is invited to share their ideas, comments and examples, responding to the message. All experiences and opinions are welcome and please don’t be shy to contribute.

On the last day of each discussion week, each Tuesday, all messages of the week will be processed and integrated into a chapter of the summary document. This will be the same for all 3 topics.

For more information please visit the SuSanA Forum.

Looking forward to hear from all of you over the coming weeks!

Sustainable Sanitation Alliance (SuSanA) is holding a 3-week thematic discussion on the topic: Urban Sanitation Finance – from Macro to Micro Level

6349815993_d122d1f5c6_o_mini_5The second SuSanA thematic discussion “Urban Sanitation Finance – from Macro to Micro Level” will start today, Tuesday 23 June 2015, on the SuSanA Discussion Forum.
The discussion will look at financing sanitation in the urban area from different angles – What are current levels of public finance at national level for urban sanitation? Is local taxation a key? What role could microfinance play to support on-site sanitation and how could different financing mechanisms be combined innovatively at city level?

During the discussion six experts on sanitation finance are providing leadership and responses on questions raised by Forum Users:

  • Theme I – Public Finance (23 June – 2 July): Catarina Fonseca (Senior Programme Officer and head of the International and Innovation Programme at IRC) and Guy Norman (Head of Evaluation, Research and Learning at Water&Sanitation for the Urban Poor, WSUP)
  • Theme II – Microfinance (30 June – 10 July): Sophie Trémolet (Director of Trémolet Consulting) and Goufrane Mansour (Consultant at Trémolet Consulting) on the topic of microfinance
  • Theme III – City level sustainable cost recovery (9 July– 16 July): Antoinette Kome (a global sector coordinator for WASH at SNV Netherlands Development Organisation ) and Kumi Abeysuriya (a senior research consultant of the Institute for Sustainable Futures, University of Technology, Sydney)

During these periods, regular summaries of forum entries will be posted to keep you updated on our conversation.

To participate in the discussion and to get prepared with a few suggested readings, please visit the discussion on the SuSanA Forum or the SuSanA website.

For any questions, please post on the forum or contact us directly at info@susana.org.

We look forward to hearing your contributions on this upcoming discussion!

Thursday, March 26th SuSanA will host a webinar on “Broadening the Horizon of Sanitation Monitoring : Operationalising the Sanitation Ladder in Post-2015”

On Thursday, March 26 at 15:00-15:45 CET, the Sustainable Sanitation Alliance (SuSanA) will host a webinar on the topic of “Broadening the Horizon of Sanitation Monitoring: Operationalising the Sanitation Ladder in Post-2015”. Registration for the webinar will take place here: http://www.susana.org/en/webinar-registration.

This webinar is a follow-up to “The Sanitation Ladder: Next Steps”, the first thematic discussion in SuSanA’s new Thematic Discussion Series. This 3-week thematic discussion (from Feb 9-27) had lively discussions on the development of the sanitation ladder and a functions-based ladder, the post-2015 agenda and monitoring challenges, and the way forward.  A synthesis of the discussion can be found here.

The 45-minute webinar will feature a short summary of the thematic discussion, then two leading questions will be provided for discussion, with input from the Thematic Leads Elisabeth Kvarnström and Ricard Gine, and the floor will then also be opened to input and questions from those in attendance.

For any questions, please post on the discussion forum or contact us at info@susana.org.

We look forward to your input and involvement in the webinar!